Search Results: "Max Boot"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 2002

"Boot's generally evenhanded approach makes some of his more immodest proposals palatable, and serious students of foreign policy, no matter what their leanings, will want to entertain his arguments."
A thoughtful history cum policy paper on the role of guerrilla warfare in the building of the American empire. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 27, 1998

"Neither a screed nor a 'balanced' report, this well-written and often witty book should give zest to those who agree with Boot's biases and food for thought to those who disagree."
A one-stop store of conservative complaints about the judiciary; in trying to eliminate lemons, the author mixes oranges and apples. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 21, 2013

"An expansive nuts-and-bolts historical survey from a keen military mind."
Wall Street Journal contributor and Council on Foreign Relations senior fellow Boot (War Made New: Technology, Warfare, and the Course of History: 1500 to Today, 2006, etc.) follows the long, quirky history of insurgency, from Bar Kokhba to Bin Laden. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOT & SHOE by Marla  Frazee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"Read unhurried, in a lap, again and again. (Picture book. 4-7)"
This gem about canine siblings goes from peaceful routine to funny mayhem to erroneous bereavement—and relief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX by Sara Cohen-Scali
YOUNG ADULT
Released: March 7, 2017

"Horrific atrocities—and the ghastly realities of any war—seen through the eyes of a child with heartbreaking cognitive dissonance pack a wallop. (Historical fiction. 15-18)"
The education of a young Nazi, from fetus to 9-year-old. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX by Bob Graham
by Bob Graham, illustrated by Bob Graham
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"The rest of the text has a tender quality that can't be overlooked, and the artwork alone—cartoony watercolors of saturated color, broken into numerous panels—will keep young eyes wholly absorbed. (Picture book. 4-7)"
No one will accuse Graham (Benny, 1999, etc.) of excessive subtlety in this story of meeting life's challenges when you are good and ready. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOT TRACKS by Matthew F. Jones
Released: May 15, 2006

"A nightmare thriller with the power to haunt."
More than just a very good crime thriller, this dark but illuminating novel shows us the psychopathology of the criminal mind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAX by Ken Wilson-Max
by Ken Wilson-Max, illustrated by Ken Wilson-Max
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Wilson-Max keeps the paper engineering simple; his cast is affable, but under-utilized by the format. (Board book. 2-5)"
A board book with pull-tabs and flaps neatly outlines a child's unconventional but loving family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOT CAMP by Todd Strasser
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 22, 2007

"Only the scene where Garrett helps two desperate teens escape provides relief from the well-intentioned but heavy-handed expose. (Fiction. YA)"
Strasser explores the intriguing topic of militaristic boot camps, described as a secret prison system with 4,000 to 10,000 teens, but he undermines his effort with implausible characters and tedious violence. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED RUBBER BOOT DAY by Mary Lyn Ray
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2000

"This exuberantly glowing book will make readers want to go out and slap in some puddles. (Picture book. 3-7)"
The team that produced the fabulously squishy Mud (1996) has done it again. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHRISTMAS BOOT by Lisa Wheeler
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"A winner of a story with enchanting illustrations by a master. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A poor and lonely woman finds a black boot in the snow, which leads to magical transformations just before Christmas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GODDESS BOOT CAMP by Tera Lynn Childs
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: June 1, 2009

"Flat secondary characters and predictable plot twists only minimally detract from the light and clever story line, which, although clearly begging comparison to Percy Jackson, makes for ideal beach reading. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Phoebe has recently learned that she is a descendent of the goddess Nike, but as amazing as that sounds, it is also a huge responsibility. Read full book review >