Search Results: "Maxine Kumin"


BOOK REVIEW

QUIT MONKS OR DIE! by Maxine Kumin
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"Kumin's stylish riddles come packaged with just enough clues to deepen their mystery till the quiet fadeout."
In the little kingdom of Montandino, California, Chief of Police Diego (Digger) Martinez is the Eagle, and Dr. Harold Baranoff is the king. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LIZZIE! by Maxine Kumin
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"Readers would do better with Millicent Min or The One and Only Ivan (2012). (Fiction. 8-11)"
Kumin's latest effort is hindered by its format; this fictional autobiography is as unpolished and disorganized as a real preteen's diary. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT COLOR IS CAESAR? by Maxine Kumin
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Friend's paintings, executed in gouache and featuring wide-eyed characters and a sunny pastoral setting, are pleasant enough but don't redeem this tedious tale. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A faux-philosophical problem, predictable plot and overlong text combine to create a disappointingly dull adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAWNBROKER'S DAUGHTER by Maxine Kumin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 6, 2015

"Kumin and her husband experienced an idyllic life on their 200-acre horse farm in New Hampshire, 'living a wide-open lifestyle.' Happily, she shared that life with the rest of us through her writing."
A posthumous publication of five essays by former Poet Laureate Kumin (And Short the Seasons: Poems, 2014, etc.), who died in 2014.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 25, 1994

"Antiseptic stories pale beside lush and verdant nonfiction: an unfortunate coupling."
A collection beginning with consistently engaging essays loses its footing in the dreary fiction that follows, bringing Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Kumin's (In Deep, 1987, etc.) latest to a wobbly end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OH, HARRY! by Maxine Kumin
ANIMALS
Released: June 21, 2011

"Good fun for the preschool set and slightly beyond. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Combine a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet with a National Book Award-winning artist and, honestly, it's hard to go wrong. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MITES TO MASTODONS by Maxine Kumin
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2006

Kumin, a distinguished poet and winner of the Pulitzer Prize, offers 19 rhyming poems that each focus on one specific creature in this somewhat uneven but beautifully illustrated collection. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PI-RAT! by Maxine Lee
by Maxine Lee, illustrated by Maxine Lee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Good piratical fun. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A pirate rat and his fearless crew sail the seas—until a "monster" ends the voyage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNS OF DEVOTION by Maxine Chernoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A dry, somewhat academic sensibility is at work here—one that will probably not be to every reader's taste."
Twenty slight, acerbic stories in which middle-class Chicagoans—old, young, gay, married, parents of children and grown children themselves—search for slender proof that they're loved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE AMONG THE ORIENTALS by Maxine Glassman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"Glassman's knowledge of and fondness for rugs is the singular strength of an otherwise wan debut outing, in which the sex is more busy than erotic and the rug-theft subplot is a half-woven afterthought."
A cloying celebration of the sexual high-jinks of the employees of a Boston rug store, punctuated by a ho-hum mystery about stolen carpets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"An eminently readable (if largely republished) collection from a writer with a keen and sympathetic eye for the private turmoils of our time."
Fifteen new stories, accompanied by substantial chunks of her two previous collections (BOP, 1986; Signs of Devotion, 1993), make clear that Chernoff still has the desirable touch of wry wit when it comes to disaffected adults and their all-too-normal problems. Read full book review >