Search Results: "Maxine Trottier"


BOOK REVIEW

SISTER TO THE WOLF by Maxine Trottier
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Engrossing historical adventure featuring a memorable feminist heroine. (maps, author's note) (Historical fiction. YA)"
The pioneer-girl genre assumes a French Canadian flavor in this story of a 15-year-old girl's journey of self-discovery as she travels west through the wilderness of 1703. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINT BOX by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"A fanciful and romantic story, vibrantly painted, providing children an opportunity to think about the making of art, the making of gender roles, and the making of history. (author's note) (Picture book. 7-10)"
The Venetian Renaissance painter Tintoretto had a daughter named Marietta, whom he dressed in boy's clothing so she could accompany him freely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIGRANT by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"The designer merits a rap on the knuckles for hiding part of the author's explanatory afterword beneath a jacket flap, but on the whole is a moving, inventive and thoughtful look at a way of life many people share. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Trottier frames the outlook of a child in a family of migrant workers within a series of metaphors and similes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG WHITE SCARF by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"Though the pictures are rich in color and detail, with a rosy Victorian glow, the text is a little too awkward in phrasing and oddly imagined to be a crowd-pleaser. (historical note) (Picture book. 6-9)"
A fictional tale about a scarf that was never owned by Queen Victoria. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAXINE BANKS IS GETTING MARRIED by Lori Aurelia Williams
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 28, 2010

"It's a pleasure watching her learn from experience and apply that earned wisdom, especially the dawning recognition that if Demonee has the right to be loved and accepted for who she is, so has Maxine herself. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
From the first line, the eponymous narrator—affectionate, funny and smart—draws readers into her story with the same strong will she uses to persuade her longtime boyfriend, Brian, to tie the knot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PI-RAT! by Maxine Lee
by Maxine Lee, illustrated by Maxine Lee
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Good piratical fun. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A pirate rat and his fearless crew sail the seas—until a "monster" ends the voyage. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Tested by the Night by Maxine Mansfield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 18, 2015

"Pleasant adventure takes a back seat to eroticism in this fantasy romance."
With her bodyguard-turned-lover at her side and a few magical tricks up her sleeve, a princess embarks on a quest to earn the right to rule her patriarchal society in the fifth installment of Mansfield's (Touched by Magic, 2012, etc.) Academy Series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAL WITH THE DEVIL by Maxine O’Callaghan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 1, 2001

"The California freeways are teeming with scrappier, edgier, more engaging shamuses, and very likely more compelling professional killers as well."
Something for almost no one in this grab bag of 15 shorts written over a 25-year span. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAW OF RETURN by Maxine Rodburg
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

THE LAW OF RETURNShort StoriesRodburg, Maxine Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WINDFALL by Maxine Paetro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 15, 1991

"It's all utterly predictable, but neatly poised between flippancy and sentiment: a smooth, wish-fulfilling ride for thirtysomething-ish females."
Paetro's third (following Babydreams, 1989, and Manshare, 1986) is a larkish tidbit that goes nicely with pi§a coladas and beach umbrellas—a trendy fantasy for the sorts of girls who invariably give their hearts to altar-shy guys. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SERIOUS GIRLS by Maxine Swann
Released: Nov. 3, 2003

"Wonderfully perceptive and precise about an age that's too often portrayed in vague generalities."
With sensitivity and quiet wit, O. Henry Award-winner Swann delineates the turmoil of adolescence. Read full book review >