Search Results: "Maxine Trottier"


BOOK REVIEW

SISTER TO THE WOLF by Maxine Trottier
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Engrossing historical adventure featuring a memorable feminist heroine. (maps, author's note) (Historical fiction. YA)"
The pioneer-girl genre assumes a French Canadian flavor in this story of a 15-year-old girl's journey of self-discovery as she travels west through the wilderness of 1703. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINT BOX by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"A fanciful and romantic story, vibrantly painted, providing children an opportunity to think about the making of art, the making of gender roles, and the making of history. (author's note) (Picture book. 7-10)"
The Venetian Renaissance painter Tintoretto had a daughter named Marietta, whom he dressed in boy's clothing so she could accompany him freely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIGRANT by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"The designer merits a rap on the knuckles for hiding part of the author's explanatory afterword beneath a jacket flap, but on the whole is a moving, inventive and thoughtful look at a way of life many people share. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Trottier frames the outlook of a child in a family of migrant workers within a series of metaphors and similes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG WHITE SCARF by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"Though the pictures are rich in color and detail, with a rosy Victorian glow, the text is a little too awkward in phrasing and oddly imagined to be a crowd-pleaser. (historical note) (Picture book. 6-9)"
A fictional tale about a scarf that was never owned by Queen Victoria. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OCTOBER SUITE by Maxine Clair
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 9, 2001

"Some fine descriptive passages and a refreshingly nuanced portrait of African-Americans who are not obsessed by race, but the tale's overly studied quality suggests that this material has been worked over one too many times."
First-novelist Clair expands on several stories from Rattlebone (1994) to chronicle a decade in the life of a midwestern schoolteacher. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FOREIGNERS by Maxine Swann
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Beautifully written, sensual and seductive."
The exotic (and erotic) aura of Buenos Aires leads Daisy, the narrator, into some murky personal and sexual encounters. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A BOY IN WINTER by Maxine Chernoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 29, 1999

"The dead hard weight of irredeemable loss lies deep at the center of this evocatively written, ultimately perplexed account, and pulls its meanings down into a darkness that remains unresolved for the reader."
Chernoff (American Heaven, 1996, etc.) describes an intractable tragedy—a young boy unintentionally murders another—with much accuracy and feeling but offers only a narrative shrug when parting with the reader. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 25, 1994

"Antiseptic stories pale beside lush and verdant nonfiction: an unfortunate coupling."
A collection beginning with consistently engaging essays loses its footing in the dreary fiction that follows, bringing Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Kumin's (In Deep, 1987, etc.) latest to a wobbly end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

A partially successful exploration of the stereotypical images and overriding themes through which many women live their lives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE AMONG THE ORIENTALS by Maxine Glassman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"Glassman's knowledge of and fondness for rugs is the singular strength of an otherwise wan debut outing, in which the sex is more busy than erotic and the rug-theft subplot is a half-woven afterthought."
A cloying celebration of the sexual high-jinks of the employees of a Boston rug store, punctuated by a ho-hum mystery about stolen carpets. Read full book review >