Search Results: "Maxine Trottier"


BOOK REVIEW

SISTER TO THE WOLF by Maxine Trottier
FANTASY
Released: Sept. 1, 2004

"Engrossing historical adventure featuring a memorable feminist heroine. (maps, author's note) (Historical fiction. YA)"
The pioneer-girl genre assumes a French Canadian flavor in this story of a 15-year-old girl's journey of self-discovery as she travels west through the wilderness of 1703. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PAINT BOX by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"A fanciful and romantic story, vibrantly painted, providing children an opportunity to think about the making of art, the making of gender roles, and the making of history. (author's note) (Picture book. 7-10)"
The Venetian Renaissance painter Tintoretto had a daughter named Marietta, whom he dressed in boy's clothing so she could accompany him freely. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIGRANT by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2011

"The designer merits a rap on the knuckles for hiding part of the author's explanatory afterword beneath a jacket flap, but on the whole is a moving, inventive and thoughtful look at a way of life many people share. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Trottier frames the outlook of a child in a family of migrant workers within a series of metaphors and similes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG WHITE SCARF by Maxine Trottier
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2005

"Though the pictures are rich in color and detail, with a rosy Victorian glow, the text is a little too awkward in phrasing and oddly imagined to be a crowd-pleaser. (historical note) (Picture book. 6-9)"
A fictional tale about a scarf that was never owned by Queen Victoria. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNS OF DEVOTION by Maxine Chernoff
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 1993

"A dry, somewhat academic sensibility is at work here—one that will probably not be to every reader's taste."
Twenty slight, acerbic stories in which middle-class Chicagoans—old, young, gay, married, parents of children and grown children themselves—search for slender proof that they're loved. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LOVE AMONG THE ORIENTALS by Maxine Glassman
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 1998

"Glassman's knowledge of and fondness for rugs is the singular strength of an otherwise wan debut outing, in which the sex is more busy than erotic and the rug-theft subplot is a half-woven afterthought."
A cloying celebration of the sexual high-jinks of the employees of a Boston rug store, punctuated by a ho-hum mystery about stolen carpets. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Touched by the Magic by Maxine Mansfield
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 13, 2012

"A saucy romp whose narrative excesses are tempered by likable lead characters and a tender love story."
A student healer and a noble paladin discover their destinies after they're paired up in a sexually charged college class in Mansfield's (Tamed by the Fire, 2013, etc.) erotic fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2001

"An eminently readable (if largely republished) collection from a writer with a keen and sympathetic eye for the private turmoils of our time."
Fifteen new stories, accompanied by substantial chunks of her two previous collections (BOP, 1986; Signs of Devotion, 1993), make clear that Chernoff still has the desirable touch of wry wit when it comes to disaffected adults and their all-too-normal problems. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DOWN FOR THE COUNT by Maxine O’Callaghan
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 11, 1997

"A no-frills tale that's as good a marriage of detective work and domestic problems as you're likely to see this season."
Private eye Delilah West must be the toughest cookie in Orange County: In her sixth case (Trade-Off, 1994, etc.), she survives two of the most violent meet-cutes on record. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 1994

A partially successful exploration of the stereotypical images and overriding themes through which many women live their lives. Read full book review >