Search Results: "Melanie McGrath"


BOOK REVIEW

MELANIE by Carol Carrick
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 16, 1996

"Everything from the knobs on Melanie's spinning wheel to the troll's red shoelaces house is in sharp, bright focus—everything, that is, but the story. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Melanie is blind. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 5, 2007

"'The relocation was an ill-conceived solution that was inhuman in its design and its effects,' the Canadian government admitted half-a-century after the fact. McGrath's careful study provides ample evidence."
No good deed goes unpunished. So discover the Inuit band that brought Nanook of the North to the silver screen. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1996

"McGrath achieves a balance between mockery and understanding that is rare among commentators on contemporary spirituality."
An Englishwoman's amused yet sympathetic journey through the New Age culture of the American West. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELANIE KLEIN by Julia Kristeva
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Of much substance, though of interest to a very small readership."
The second installment, of more narrow interest than her Hannah Arendt (p. 787), in postmodern pioneer Kristeva's planned three-volume triptych on female geniuses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MEETING MELANIE by Nancy Garden
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 25, 2002

"Questions of out-of-wedlock pregnancy, class distinctions, wealth, and poverty are touched upon, if not wrestled with, and there's just enough food for thought to keep things interesting. (Fiction. 10-13)"
Allie, almost 12, loves her life on Seal Head Island off the coast of Maine, but it promises to be a hard summer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELANIE JANE by Susan Arkin Couture
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 30, 1996

"For actual silliness and less moralistic fervor, stick with Stieg's Spinky Sulks (1988). (Picture book. 3-6)"
Bright colors and winsome illustrations cannot sweeten this didactic rhyming tale from two picture-book newcomers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 14, 2002

"Go, go, go girl. (Fiction. 7-10)"
The subtitle and cover set the tone, writing style, and scene for this breezy, fun, lighthearted read that quite naturally folds in contemporary issues of breast cancer fears and the meaning of intolerance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELANIE IN MANHATTAN by Carol Weston
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 8, 2005

"Fun, fun, fun. (Fiction. 8-12)"
Home—for a travel adventure? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIARY OF MELANIE MARTIN by Carol Weston
ADVENTURE
Released: May 1, 2000

"Sprinkled with exclamation points, pronounced Italian words ('piazza (Pee Ot Za)' etc) and small drawings, Melanie's journal will tease fans of the Eloise sequels and like travelogues into further armchair adventuring. (Fiction. 9-11)"
This teen gossip columnist's fiction debut floats like a bubble in the breeze, despite plenty of traumatic events and sibling conflict. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 2004

"Not all preaching to the choir, though—comparative-religion types at least should take a look."
Tremble, ye doubters: God isn't dead. He's back—and He's brought friends. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN FEELING BAD IS GOOD by Ellen McGrath
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 2, 1992

"McGrath breaks no new ground here, but she plows old fields with a sure hand, without stodginess or flippancy. (Drawings.)"
According to clinical psychologist McGrath (former chairperson of the American Psychological Association's National Task Force on Women and Depression), it's perfectly normal to feel depressed if you're a woman—in fact, if you're not angry or feeling victimized by the cultural pain of being female, you're living ``in a fantasy world of denial.'' Here—in a handbook packed with quizzes, diagrams, lists, charts, and exercises, and dramatized by pseudonymous anecdotes from her practice—McGrath spells out with great clarity how to recognize these bad feelings and use them positively. Read full book review >