Search Results: "Melissa Fay Greene"


BOOK REVIEW

NO BIKING IN THE HOUSE WITHOUT A HELMET by Melissa Fay Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 3, 2011

"An upbeat chronicle of a life that has been lived on the bright side of the road, its ruts beveled by naked love."
The prodigiously cheering reflections of a mother gathering a large brood of children, both biological and adopted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TEMPLE BOMBING by Melissa Fay Greene
NON-FICTION
Released: April 12, 1996

"Still, a powerful retelling of a crucial tragedy that, in all its elements, resonates all too loudly today; and a tribute to Rothschild—a forgotten, well, hero of the civil rights movement."
An urgent, fiery reconstruction of a tragic moment in the history of Atlanta, a moment when the combustible mix of black oppression, Jewish liberalism, and white anxiety finally blew up in an otherwise peaceful city. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNDERDOGS by Melissa Fay Greene
NON-FICTION
Released: May 17, 2016

"Dog lovers, parents of special needs kids, and those who love feel-good stories will delight in these heartwarming portraits of dogs and their families."
Personal stories of service dogs in action. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 1, 2003

"Its release so soon after the widely publicized Pennsylvania mining disaster and rescue should boost the book commercially, but this sensitive account stands on its own artistic merits. (8 b&w photos, not seen)"
A strikingly told story of a Canadian mining catastrophe. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRAYING FOR SHEETROCK by Melissa Fay Greene
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 3, 1991

"Perhaps too discursive for some, with scenes of evocation before and after every piece of action; still, a beautifully written and absolutely authentic picture of the rural South."
In 1971, McIntosh County, N.C., was a tiny hamlet of 1800 souls—half of them black—that the civil-rights movement, played out in cities, had passed by: a hard-scrabble setting for Greene's powerful book debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAY by Larry Brown
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 31, 2000

"Close to a masterpiece."
The search for love and family has seldom been portrayed with such harsh realism as in this almost literally stunning fourth novel by the highly acclaimed Mississippi author. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GREENE by Graham Greene
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 19, 1969

"It concludes with the sad apostrophe, 'How could they tell that for a writer as much as for a priest there is no such thing as success?"
Half of the essays here, including his more important sequence on Henry James, have been reprinted from Mr. Greene's 1952 collection The Lost Childhood which established in Greene's case that the creative writer could also be a critic of some distinction. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2008

"A lucid account of the Revolutionary War from the point of view of its most successful general."
Rhode Island journalist Carbone gives a little-known Revolutionary War leader his due in this admiring biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 1, 1995

"Despite Shelden's relentless animus for Greene as a person and a writer, this propaganda campaign can neither surpass nor subvert the Greene legend. (16 pages b&w photos, not seen)"
Trying to hunt down the controversial, complex Greene (190491) as the Harry Lime of the literary racket, Shelden (Orwell, 1991, etc.) succeeds less in decoding the deceptions of Greene's life than in creating a trail of false leads. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Othello Greene by Anthony H. Baltimore, Sr.
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 4, 2016

"This terrorist tale reads like a thrilling but extremely violent action movie, with some intriguing twists in plot and philosophy."
A debut novel offers the broad scope of a Hollywood blockbuster, with two formidable, high-tech groups at war. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 14, 1973

"There is also an inductive introduction by Mr. Greene on how he now views the short story and on some of the curious circumstances in which a few of them were conceived."
Forty in all, representing a forty-year span, "a collection of escapes from the novelist's world" and combining those which appeared in May We Borrow Your Husband?, A Sense of Reality, Twenty-One Stories, as well as three which appear in book form for the first time. Read full book review >