Search Results: "Melissa Hill"


BOOK REVIEW

HILL by Jean Giono
by Jean Giono, translated by Paul Eprile
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 5, 2016

"Though this novel is nearly 90 years old, its sharp focus and uncompromising storytelling leave it feeling hauntingly timeless—a story of primal conflicts erupting into seemingly pastoral landscapes."
In this newly translated 1929 novel, a small community in Provence is forced to contend with internal strife and environmental catastrophes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A GIFT FROM TIFFANY'S by Melissa Hill
Released: Oct. 16, 2012

"Nothing electric or spectacular, but a nice, sweet Christmas romance wrapped up in a pretty robin's egg blue box."
Two men find themselves buying gifts at Tiffany's on Fifth Avenue on Christmas Eve, but when there's an accident, packages are rearranged and lives changed by a few simple twists of fate. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO SHOULD MELISSA MARRY? by Doris Cassiday
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 1, 1994

"But there's no denying that fashion writer Cassiday's moderately interesting son-of-Silhouette romance is easier to take than the telegraphic, wildly formulaic demises of the Robinses."
That publicity-surfing entrepreneur Bill Adler, who created and decimated the Robins family (Who Killed the Robins Family?, 1984, etc.), is at it again, this time with another contest novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MELISSA PARKINGTON’S BEAUTIFUL, BEAUTIFUL HAIR by Pat Brisson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

Melissa's long, thick, shiny black hair impresses everyone. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Lords Hill by Maggie Miller
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 29, 2014

"A profound meditation on the overcoming of past trauma."
In this unflinchingly candid memoir, debut author Miller recounts a childhood of abuse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUGAR HILL by Carole Boston Weatherford
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2014

"A fine tribute to the local color of Sugar Hill, who have made America a better and more interesting country for almost a century. (Informational picture book. 7-9)"
Weatherford's poetic, swinging textual rhythms meet Christie's artistic razzmatazz to create one hot picture book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PROSPECT HILL by Richard Francis
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 15, 2004

"A veddy British story for fans of Amis père et fils, Malcolm Bradbury, and even Dickens. Nicely done."
Life is a series of accidents—that just gets weirder when you throw in politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEULAH HILL by William Heffernan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"Nifty stuff, with big hooks from page one."
Interracial thriller by Heffernan, known most recently for his tough-talking newspaper tale Cityside (1999). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NAZARETH HILL by Ramsey Campbell
Released: June 11, 1997

"Shocking surprises, alarming horrors, and believable characters—all expertly blended in a fresh, deft shocker."
British horror novelist Campbell (The One Safe Place, 1996, etc.), expert as ever and with a knack for family chitchat amid the ghoulies, returns with the house from hell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GALLOWS HILL by Lois Duncan
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: May 1, 1997

"Bleakly shallow. (further reading) (Fiction. 12+)"
A sloppy suspense novel—Duncan (Night Terrors, 1996, etc.) unsuccessfully charts a plot full of witchcraft, ESP, reincarnation, book-burning, and fortune-telling, as well as an utterly incredible chain of events. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOL'S HILL by Barbara Hall
FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"A tender, appealing growing- up story. (Fiction 11+)"
Again, Hall (Dixie Storms, 1990) affectionately re-creates a summer in the South without glamorizing the opportunities (or lack of them) for teens who live there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOCIAL HILL by Jason Hill
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 2016

"An intriguingly realistic social tale about a despairing parent."
A debut autobiographical novel follows a black father dealing with—or avoiding—his problems, and all the effects this has on his family and friends. Read full book review >