Search Results: "Melissa Wiley"


BOOK REVIEW

THE PRAIRIE THIEF by Melissa Wiley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 28, 2012

"A pleasing folkloric/historical blend. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
How can Louisa save her Pa after he's been accused of thievery, a crime punishable on the prairie by hanging, without breaking the promise she made to another? Even if she tells the truth, who will believe her? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOX AND CROW ARE NOT FRIENDS by Melissa Wiley
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 7, 2012

"Funny chapter titles will amuse adults, and subtle visual details make this a fable book that new readers will return to. (Early reader. 3-7)"
The familiar fable about Fox and Crow, retold for new readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 19, 2007

"A serviceable local history of a Southern tradition."
Personal reflection cum historical study concerning the Fountain camp meeting in Georgia. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 27, 1996

"Humor is a formidable weapon, and Wiley puts it to outstanding use in this sharp-edged book. (Author tour)"
A broad, often wildly funny examination of ``blackness'' in America, by the author of What Black People Should Do Now (1993). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 12, 1992

"A critical Civil War campaign, narrated with brisk attention to the nuances of strategy—and with measured solemnity over the waste of life in war. (Forty-six b&w photographs and 17 maps—not seen.)"
Just as commercial blight covers the once bloodstained battlefields of Franklin and Nashville, so have other Civil War battles obscured the significance of Rebel defeats there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"A delightfully monstrous and fresh take on a traditional story."
This fairy-tale retelling by picture-book veteran Blevins (Colors All Around, 2016, etc.) and illustrator Cox (Ben's Rocket, 2016, etc.) might be just what the fairy godmother ordered for readers who are bored of goody-two-shoes Cinderellas.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"A rude, rousing defense and celebration of African-American culture."
A barrage of angry, cranky, funny, exciting pieces by black journalist Wiley (Why Black People Tend to Shout, 1991; Serenity, 1989). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLUE AVENUE by Michael Wiley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Dec. 1, 2014

"Repeated doses of strong sexual violence make this one definitely not for the kiddies. First of a series, though you have to wonder who's left in Jacksonville for the sequels."
Wiley moves south from his three tales of Chicago shamus Joe Kozmarski (A Bad Night's Sleep, 2011, etc.) to Florida, where an even less heroic sleuth faces an even seamier mystery.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BAD KITTY LOUNGE by Michael Wiley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 2, 2010

"Sound and fury and mindless violence, signifying that a pretty good writer has yet to find a story commensurate with his talent."
Sinful seeds bear murderous fruit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AHMED'S REVENGE by Richard Wiley
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 1998

"But his portrait of a woman reinventing herself—and a nation painfully trying to invent itself—is powerful and moving, confirming him as one of the most interesting and least predictable of young American novelists. (Author tour)"
A haunting, deeply ironic study of betrayal, revenge, and rebirth in early 1970s Kenya. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INDIGO by Richard Wiley
Released: Sept. 8, 1992

"Wiley's affection for Nigeria and Nigerians gives his work a buoyancy that compensates for but cannot hide its weaknesses: Jerry's blandness, the contrivance of his immersion in Nigerian culture, and an ending that elevates his cleansed vision above the national tragedy of Beany's death."
Wiley (Soldiers in Hiding, 1985, etc.) continues to range far afield for his material; here, his subject is the reeducation of an American in Nigeria. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"Despite starting slowly, Sword's study gathers momentum enough to fashion a compelling and nuanced accounting of the South's flawed confidence in its cause. (16 pages b&w photos)"
A representative study of "the mainstream thinking of white southerners" during the Civil War ponders the psychological roots and eventual consequences of the Confederacy's flawed belief in its own invincibility. Read full book review >