Search Results: "Mia March"


BOOK REVIEW

THE MERYL STREEP MOVIE CLUB by Mia March
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 19, 2012

"A heartwarming, spirit-lifting read just in time for beach season."
When Lolly Weller summons her daughter and nieces home to The Three Captains' Inn, her announcement that she has been diagnosed with cancer is just one of many life-changing secrets to be told. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIA by Edward Z. Epstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 9, 1991

"Not in any sense a companion volume to Eric Lax's richly researched, intimate Woody Allen (p. 457). (Sixteen pages of b&w photographs—not seen.)"
Uninspired life of the little-girl-lost actress, by the authors of Paul and Joanna, Brando, Loretta Young, Jane Wyman, etc., etc. Here's a book as shallow as any scissors-and-paste job, with as little fresh material. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCH by John Lewis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Aug. 2, 2016

"This memoir's unique eyewitness view of epochal events makes it essential reading for an understanding of those times—and these. (Graphic memoir. 11 & up)"
A living icon of the civil rights movement brings his frank and stirring account of the movement's most tumultuous years (so far) to a climax. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCH by Geraldine Brooks
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 7, 2005

"The battle scenes are riveting, the human drama flat."
Brooks combines her penchant for historical fiction (Year of Wonders, 2001, etc.) with the literary-reinvention genre as she imagines the Civil War from the viewpoint of Little Women's Mr. March (a stand-in for Bronson Alcott). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCH by John Lewis
GRAPHIC NOVELS & COMIC BOOKS
Released: Jan. 20, 2015

"'We're gonna march'—oh, yes. (Graphic memoir. 11 & up)"
Heroism and steadiness of purpose continue to light up Lewis' frank, harrowing account of the civil rights movement's climactic days—here, from cafeteria sit-ins in Nashville to the March on Washington. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MARCH by John Lewis
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 13, 2013

"A powerful tale of courage and principle igniting sweeping social change, told by a strong-minded, uniquely qualified eyewitness. (Graphic memoir. 11-15)"
Eisner winner Powell's dramatic black-and-white graphic art ratchets up the intensity in this autobiographical opener by a major figure in the civil rights movement. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL ABOUT MIA by Lisa Williamson
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Sept. 12, 2017

"Readers will root for Mia to get her act together on her chaotic, hilarious journey to self-discovery. (Fiction. 14-18)"
Between academic superstar Grace and Olympics-caliber swimmer Audrey, middle-sister Mia (talent: getting wasted) can't shake the "trouble" label. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIA THE MEEK by Eileen Boggess
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2006

"Borderline farce, but fun and funny. (Fiction. 10-14)"
An insecure freshman sets out to improve her self-esteem in this hilarious tale of teen transformation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 14, 2011

"Galloping popular history, guaranteed to entertain."
Manifest Destiny fulfilled: Groom (Vicksburg, 1863, 2009, etc.) spotlights four journeys during two tumultuous years in American history that marked a "stupendous westward shift." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARCH by E.L. Doctorow
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 20, 2005

"Doctorow's previous novels have earned multiple major literary awards. The March should do so as well."
William Tecumseh Sherman's legendary "march" (1864-65) through Georgia and the Carolinas—toward Appomattox, and victory—is the subject of Doctorow's panoramic tenth novel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DEAD MARCH by Ann McMillan
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1998

"Historian McMillan's first novel is a rewarding period piece that mixes decorous tableaux out of Margaret Mitchell with unflinching glimpses of slavery, surgery, and the horrors of war and sudden death."
On the eve of Virginia's nervous preparations to join the Confederacy, Charley Wilson, a Richmond medical student pressed into service as a grave robber in order to satisfy Hampden-Sydney's need for anatomical specimens, sees that the latest corpse his little group has dug up did not go gently into that good night. Read full book review >