Search Results: "Michael Bedard"


BOOK REVIEW

SITTING DUCKS by Michael Bedard
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"It is good to see a duck tinkering with destiny, and it is grand to see him turn a potentially depressing ending into a happy one, even if his friend—dreaming of chicken, perhaps apropos of a sequel—makes the other ducks a shade nervous. (Picture book. 6-10)"
Bedard's satirical picture book debut features his poster duck, who, with his many cloned brethren, figure here as the product of the Colossal Duck Factory. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

REDWORK by Michael Bedard
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

Struggling to make ends meet while she finishes a thesis on Blake, Alison and her son, Cass, move into an apartment in the crumbling home of mysterious Mr. Magnus, WW I survivor and recluse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STAINED GLASS by Michael Bedard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Not for everyone, or even for most, but a small gem awaiting the special reader. (Fiction. 11-15)"
Bedard (Painted Devil, 1994, etc.) returns again to the Canadian town of Caledon for an understated foray into magical realism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAINTED DEVIL by Michael Bedard
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1994

"The better-defined horrors in Mahy's Changeover and Westwood's He Came From The Shadows create more vivid impressions. (Fiction. 11-13)"
Twenty-eight years after the harrowing events in A Darker Magic (1987), evil rises again in the town of Caledon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREEN MAN by Michael Bedard
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 10, 2012

"Ideal for those with a penchant for magic, mystery and poetry. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
Fifteen-year-old Ophelia, known as O, encounters the unexpected when she spends a transformative summer with her aunt, a poet and the proprietor of a secondhand bookshop called the Green Man, "where extraordinary things [happen]." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EMILY by Michael Bedard
Released: Nov. 1, 1992

"An evocative glimpse of a formal society that will seem quite foreign to most children today, and of a mysterious, oddly independent woman who fascinated her own contemporaries as much as she does ours. (Picture book. 5+)"
A Canadian novelist (Redwork, 1990) pays tribute to Amherst's great poet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHTINGALE by Michael Bedard
adapted by Michael Bedard, illustrated by Regolo Ricci
ANIMALS
Released: March 23, 1992

"And why not credit the true author on the title page? (He is mentioned on both the verso and the jacket, but LC's main entry is Bedard, which will cause a problem for libraries that care—as they should.) (Picture book. 5-10)"
An elegantly presented edition of a favorite Andersen story with artfully composed paintings, rich in Chinese detail, receding into the background behind vertical bars of text pulled down like golden window shades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DIVIDE by Michael Bedard
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"The afterword makes reference to Cather's writings, but does not list specific sources for Bedard's text. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A picture book about what Willa Cather may have experienced as a child when her family moved west. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MICHAEL NESMITH
by Nick A. Zaino III

Michael Nesmith’s first big job in the music industry didn’t make much sense to him. He was hired—along with Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork—to be part of a rock and roll band on television called the Monkees. It would change his life in ways he couldn’t quite comprehend. He addresses this in his new memoir, Infinite Tuesday: An ...


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BLOG POST

MICHAEL FRANK
by Marjorie Baumgarten

Perhaps you recognize the names of Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr. A married couple, they were Hollywood screenwriters responsible for authoring such Oscar-nominated classics as Hud and Norma Rae. Active from the late Forties through the mid-Eighties, the collaborators built a reputation for quality scripts based on their eight films with maverick filmmaker Martin Ritt and their screen adaptations ...


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BLOG POST

MICHAEL TWITTY
by Gregory McNamee

Recipes, like people, have DNA. It may take some ferreting out, some hard kitchen testing, some documentary research, and some more tasting and adjusting, but eventually that yellowed slip of paper tucked into grandmom’s copy of Joy of Cooking will yield its ancestry, reveal its origins through the patina of the past, and show how tastes and ingredients have changed ...


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