Search Results: "Michael F. Stewart"


BOOK REVIEW

Assured Destruction by Michael F. Stewart
Released: March 22, 2013

"A fun, fast-paced thriller guaranteed to distract teens from Facebook for at least a little while."
The real-world consequences of a teenage hacker's online exploits threaten to bring down her familybusiness in the first book of Stewart's (Ruination, 2012, etc.) projected teen thriller series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEP IN A COLD, DARK PLACE by Michael F. Stewart
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 18, 2017

"A darkly funny rural tale with a scary bent."
A middle-grade novel tells the story of a girl's monstrous discovery on the family farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COMPULSION by Michael Stewart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1994

"Damage."
Wasting no time in preliminaries, Stewart (Belladonna, 1992, etc.) opens with mutilated model Cristina Parigi's frantic, fatal, very public plunge into the East River and then, within a few pages, shows her employer already erotically re-creating herself as Cristina. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BELLADONNA by Michael Stewart
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 1, 1992

"Stewart, a generally talented writer, just doesn't know when to quit."
From the title-pun—about a beautiful but deadly heroine—on: an intelligent, literate occult thriller that suffers from the melodramatic excess typical of Stewart's previous chillers (Grace, 1989, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED TED AND THE LOST THINGS by Michael Rosen
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2009

"A satisfying tale for all involved, from the adopted crocodile, satiated cat and found teddy bear to the readers who will delight in this sweet adventure. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Red Ted, accidentally left behind, is deposited in the Place for Lost Things. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 17, 2013

"An interesting take on American political life during the past 50 years, persuasively backed by anecdotal evidence and macro-level research."
American citizens weren't so complacent during the 1970s and '80s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2004

"Important but occasionally tedious analysis of a most critical period in our history. (map; 8 pp. b&w illustrations, not seen)"
It wasn't slavery per se but the debates about the extension of slavery into new territories and states that sent the nation careening into civil war, argues Holt (History/Univ. of Virginia) in a work that aims at a broader audience than did his The Rise and Fall of the American Whig Party (1999). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 4, 2016

"A well-researched, well-documented, and highly readable account."
A history of the Hamitic hypothesis, from its origins in the story of Noah's disgraced son Ham in the book of Genesis to its presence in the Rwandan genocide of recent decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 1, 2012

"A persuasively argued, though dense and occasionally pedantic treatise—will appeal to students of literature and liberal politics."
Examination of the mid-20th-century novels that reenergized the Democratic Party's staid image. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK ELK by Michael F. Steltenkamp
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 1993

"A real step forward in American Indian religious studies."
Based on conversations with Black Elk's surviving friends and relatives, especially his daughter Lucy Looks Twice: a reassessment of the Lakota holy man's religious vocation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GHOSTS OF JIM CROW by F. Michael Higginbotham
NON-FICTION
Released: March 18, 2013

"A book worthy of a wide audience and wide discussion."
A vision of enhancing racial equality—or simply lessening racial inequality—in America. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRAVEYARD SHIFT by Michael F.  Haspil
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 18, 2017

"Fans of urban fantasy, noir, and tightly choreographed action scenes will enjoy the blood and bullets in this adrenaline-heavy ride through crime scenes and secret societies; just don't expect too much introspection."
In Haspil's debut novel, two immortal cops—a mummy and a vampire—work to solve killings in a Miami where humans and vampires (as well as other supernatural creatures) have reached a tenuous peace. Read full book review >