Search Results: "Michael Gross"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2003

"One-note and strangely impersonal: the public Lauren when readers were looking for the private. (12 b&w photos)"
Tepid, unauthorized biography of The King of Lifestyle Merchandizing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 1995

"Model wannabes will be well advised to read and reread these cautionary tales—and to hide this volume from their parents. (50 b&w photos, not seen)"
This intelligent and intermittently absorbing history of the modeling industry offers a group portrait of playboys, party girls, and a few genuine talents.. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 11, 2014

"An incisive but somewhat tedious report of New York's 'new money.'"
Travel + Leisure contributing editor Gross' (Unreal Estate: Money, Ambition, and the Lust for Land in Los Angeles, 2011, etc.) latest chronicle of the .01 percent shifts to the other side of Central Park. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"A juicy, breezily told social history of La La Land, deal by deal."
Location, location, location. Gross (Rogues' Gallery: The Secret History of the Moguls and the Money that Made the Metropolitan Museum, 2009, etc.) presents a history of Los Angeles land development that is rich in incident and full of thwarted ambition, visionary zeal and conspicuous consumption. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOCUS by Michael Gross
NON-FICTION
Released: July 5, 2016

"Not a pretty picture of sex, drugs, beautiful women, and raw ambition."
The reality of fashion photography "can be murky, often decadent, and sometimes downright ugly." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 12, 2009

"A deft rendering of the down-and-dirty politics of the art world."
A behind-the-scenes history of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MICHAEL NESMITH
by Nick A. Zaino III

Michael Nesmith’s first big job in the music industry didn’t make much sense to him. He was hired—along with Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork—to be part of a rock and roll band on television called the Monkees. It would change his life in ways he couldn’t quite comprehend. He addresses this in his new memoir, Infinite Tuesday: An ...


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BLOG POST

MICHAEL FRANK
by Marjorie Baumgarten

Perhaps you recognize the names of Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr. A married couple, they were Hollywood screenwriters responsible for authoring such Oscar-nominated classics as Hud and Norma Rae. Active from the late Forties through the mid-Eighties, the collaborators built a reputation for quality scripts based on their eight films with maverick filmmaker Martin Ritt and their screen adaptations ...


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BLOG POST

ÉDOUARD LOUIS
by Rhett Morgan

In 2014 at the age of 22, Édouard Louis published his first novel, The End of Eddy, in France and caused a sensation in the French press. Like another recently celebrated European author, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Louis takes directly from his own life to craft bleak images. Also like Knausgaard, he came under intense media scrutiny as investigative journalists sought ...


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BOOK REVIEW

I SEE, YOU SEE: DAY by Sandra Gross
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2016

"For a baby's first foray into books, there are far better high-contrast titles than this offering, such as Phyllis Limbacher Tildes' Baby Animals Spots & Stripes (2015) and Baby Animals Day & Night (2016). (Board book. 0-2)"
In this wordless board book, babies can explore everyday objects and scenes rendered in high-contrast black-and-white art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAME BED, DIFFERENT DREAMS by Hugh Gross
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 29, 1991

"Strong passages and emotional resonance indicate quality craftsmanship, but ultimately this is a jumble of good impressions rather than a coherent story."
Utilizing Gross's firsthand knowledge of the country and its way of life, but curiously detached and disjointed, this first novel offers a view of modern Japan in crisis, focusing on the decay of a middle-class Japanese family in which the parents are placed at cross purposes by social conventions and personal needs. Read full book review >