Search Results: "Michael J. Blahut"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 26, 2013

"An engaging, if occasionally disjointed, memoir."
A proud father shares correspondence with his son, who served in the Peace Corps in Fiji. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2000

"The definitive resource for understanding this deeply troubling episode in the 20th century's greatest horror. (8 pages b&w photos, 4 maps)"
Essays by military and Holocaust historians (whose answers to the question in the subtitle vary widely), supplemented with relevant primary documents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHANGHAIED TO THE MOON by Michael J. Daley
ADVENTURE
Released: March 1, 2007

"Readers who enjoyed Daley's surer Space Station Rat (2005) will wonder what he was thinking. (Science fiction. 10-12)"
Straightforward sci-fi adventure veers off course into a black hole of pop psych in this confused outing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPACE STATION RAT by Michael J. Daley
ANIMALS
Released: June 15, 2005

"If this leads those readers to Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH, all the better. (Fiction. 8-12)"
In a space station far far away lives one escaped lab rat with an extraordinary knowledge of all things human, one boy who is ignored by his scientist parents and one single-minded robot named Nanny. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOME by Michael J. Rosen
edited by Michael J. Rosen, illustrated by Aliki
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 30, 1992

"Not, perhaps, a first choice to give the homeless themselves, but one to engender thoughtful discussion among luckier children. (Picture book. 4-9)"
This latest title in support of a worthy cause is subtitled ``A Collaboration of Thirty Distinguished Authors and Illustrators of Children's Books to Aid the Homeless.'' In this context, the theme seems bittersweet—yet celebrating the joys of one's own special place does effectively dramatize the deprivation of being homeless. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A STORM TOO SOON by Michael J. Tougias
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 24, 2016

"A sure-fire hit with young readers who are always ready for a good disaster tale. (epilogue, author's note) (Nonfiction. 9-14)"
In an adaptation for young readers of his A Storm Too Soon: A True Story of Disaster, Survival, and an Incredible Rescue (2013), Tougias tells the story of the Sean Seymour II, a 44-foot sailboat swamped in a Gulf Stream storm in 2007. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 7, 1992

"Intriguing but—particularly in Apter's reinterpretation of data regarding sensation-seeking—not wholly convincing."
An examination of why humans crave excitement and why excitement has value for both the individual and the culture. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 8, 1998

"And yet he makes a thorough and fascinating case, one that will no doubt anger those holding to the orthodoxies laid down by Darwin. (50 b&w illustrations, 15 b&w photos, not seen)"
The author of Evolution: A Theory in Crisis (not reviewed) again confronts the notion that the presence of humankind is a random event in a random universe, asserting that "the cosmos is uniquely fit for the specific type of life that exists on Earth." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VEILED SUMMER by Michael J. Mc Glynn
Released: July 19, 2012

"A challenging, startling tale of a mother and son."
In his debut novel, Mc Glynn tells an elegiac, haunting story exploring the ramifications of past actions on the present. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WINSHIP FAMILY by Michael J. McCarthy
Released: Jan. 14, 2013

"A few liberties taken with the facts, but an excellent choice for readers interested in Anglo-Irish history."
Set in the 19th century, this novel follows the lives of Protestant Anglo-Irish landowners William Winship and his adopted son, James, mixing fictional characters with historical figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 5, 2007

"Not science, but a tract to comfort those who want to believe."
More on Intelligent Design from its chief proponent, who trots out even more minutiae on the "irreducible complexities" of cells and their parts previously discussed in Darwin's Black Box (1996). Read full book review >