Search Results: "Michael Pollan"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: May 15, 2001

"Lively writing and colorful anecdotes enhance this insightful look at an unexpected side of agriculture."
We've cultivated plants since the dawn of time; but all along, the plants have been cultivating us as well. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECOND NATURE by Michael Pollan
NON-FICTION
Released: May 3, 1991

"More than a gardening book, this is a well-developed philosophy of life and nature in a technological world."
From the executive editor of Harper's magazine, an important and profoundly original book that is a radical departure from the standard gardening text. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: March 17, 1997

"Pollan inexplicably denies himself and the reader a payoff passage that finds him comfortably seated at desk, pen in hand, ready for writing. (illustrations)"
An editor at Harper's magazine, Pollan (Second Nature, 1991) spent two and a half years of Saturday afternoons building a ``writing house'' in the backyard of his northwestern Connecticut home. ``I wanted not only a room of my own,'' he writes, ``but a room of my own making.'' A ``radically unhandy man,'' he sought the guidance of two ``Virgils'': architect Charles Myer and handyman/carpenter Joe Benney. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 1, 2008

"Solid advice for healthy eating, but lacks Pollan's arrestingly original journalistic flair."
An anemic follow-up to The Omnivore's Dilemma examines food in a nutritional rather than an environmental context. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

Not every volume will change a reader's life, but this one just might. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COOKED by Michael Pollan
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 23, 2013

"A delightful chronicle of the education of a cook who steps back frequently to extol the scientific and philosophical basis of this deeply satisfying human activity."
Having described what's wrong with American food in his best-selling The Omnivore's Dilemma (2006), New York Times contributor Pollan (Journalism/Univ. of California; Food Rules, 2012, etc.) delivers a more optimistic but equally fascinating account of how to do it right. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 11, 2006

"Revelations about how the way we eat affects the world we live in, presented with wit and elegance."
The dilemma—what to have for dinner when you are a creature with an open-ended appetite—leads Pollan (Journalism/Berkeley; The Botany of Desire, 2001, etc.) to a fascinating examination of the myriad connections along the principal food chains that lead from earth to dinner table. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOOD RULES by Michael Pollan
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"A pleasure for foodies and a fine gift for anyone who prizes a good meal—but maybe not if that person works for General Mills or in the advertising biz."
What should you eat? How should you eat it? Pollan, doyen of all things food-related, serves up the answers in this jauntily illustrated version of his 2009 book. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MICHAEL NESMITH
by Nick A. Zaino III

Michael Nesmith’s first big job in the music industry didn’t make much sense to him. He was hired—along with Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork—to be part of a rock and roll band on television called the Monkees. It would change his life in ways he couldn’t quite comprehend. He addresses this in his new memoir, Infinite Tuesday: An ...


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MICHAEL FRANK
by Marjorie Baumgarten

Perhaps you recognize the names of Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr. A married couple, they were Hollywood screenwriters responsible for authoring such Oscar-nominated classics as Hud and Norma Rae. Active from the late Forties through the mid-Eighties, the collaborators built a reputation for quality scripts based on their eight films with maverick filmmaker Martin Ritt and their screen adaptations ...


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MICHAEL TWITTY
by Gregory McNamee

Recipes, like people, have DNA. It may take some ferreting out, some hard kitchen testing, some documentary research, and some more tasting and adjusting, but eventually that yellowed slip of paper tucked into grandmom’s copy of Joy of Cooking will yield its ancestry, reveal its origins through the patina of the past, and show how tastes and ingredients have changed ...


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ÉDOUARD LOUIS
by Rhett Morgan

In 2014 at the age of 22, Édouard Louis published his first novel, The End of Eddy, in France and caused a sensation in the French press. Like another recently celebrated European author, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Louis takes directly from his own life to craft bleak images. Also like Knausgaard, he came under intense media scrutiny as investigative journalists sought ...


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