Search Results: "Michael S. Neiberg"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 1, 2005

"A very worthy addition to the historical literature, complementing Hew Strachan's The First World War (2004), Robert Massie's Castles of Steel (2003), and other recent studies of the war."
A searching study of the war to end all wars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PATH TO WAR by Michael S. Neiberg
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 3, 2016

"A valiant attempt to dispel 'America's collective amnesia over the First World War.'"
A fresh look at America's reluctance to enter World War I as a mass consensus rather than any single faulty decision by President Woodrow Wilson. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

POTSDAM by Michael Neiberg
NON-FICTION
Released: May 5, 2015

"Fills a hitherto surprisingly empty niche in the World War II library."
A military historian analyzes the significance of the final conference of the World War II allies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 2, 2012

"An evenhanded, efficient account of one of World War II's signature moments."
From the Allied landings at Normandy to Charles de Gaulle's triumphant march down the Champs-Élysées, a war historian tracks the ouster of the Nazis from the City of Light. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 21, 2012

"An original, fascinating scientific history of how human memory and a series of inventions have driven the advance of civilization."
Every living organism possesses a memory, however primitive, but Homo sapiens carried it to a dazzling level, writes technology journalist Malone (The Future Arrived Yesterday: The Rise of the Protean Corporation and What It Means for You, 2009, etc.) in this ingenious, richly complex account of how humans exchange, record, preserve and manipulate information. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TALES FROM BOTH SIDES OF THE BRAIN by Michael S. Gazzaniga
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 3, 2015

"A lively appreciation of both the complexity of the human mind and the scientific enterprise."
"How on earth does the brain enable mind?" That is the still-to-be-answered question posed by Gazzaniga (Who's in Charge: Free Will and the Science of the Brain, 2011, etc.), the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of Mind at the University of California, Santa Barbara.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"Sanders depicts the works as part of a remarkable and increasingly rare industry that fuses technological innovation with proud craftsmanship and a work ethic that makes a shipfitter's affectionate patting of a 9,000-ton hull a very natural gesture. (photos, not seen)"
An unhurried, meticulous, character-rich portrait of the Bath Iron Works, where the navy's destroyers are built, is the subject of Maine writer Sanders's first book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: April 13, 1999

"An exhaustive eulogy to a once-great company that changed the world but fell prey to its own antiestablishment fervor."
A long-winded invective against Steve Jobs, infamous co-founder of the Apple Computer company. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCENARISTS OF EUROPE by Michael S. Judge
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 11, 2016

"It's not for everyone, but for those willing to take the hyperbolic, meditative trip, it will stimulate, confuse, and exhaust."
This experimental novel's torrent of language creates a dark and unsettling apocalyptic world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MIND'S PAST by Michael S. Gazzaniga
NON-FICTION
Released: May 1, 1998

"An intriguing theory, assertively stated, but often Gazzaniga's arguments seem too reductive or dogmatic to be convincing. (12 b&w illustrations, not seen)"
Adding to a growing genre that purports to say how mind arises from brain, a study that is short and witty but not entirely convincing. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 15, 1995

"An exercise in academic revisionism evidently intended to challenge the conventional wisdom of the political right and (to a lesser extent) left on the lessons of the recent past."
A critical history of the US from the mid-1930s on, in which militarization serves as an organizing principle if not a determinant of geopolitical and socioeconomic events. Read full book review >