Search Results: "Michael Shermer"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 2, 2008

"An informative, inventive, broad-spectrum analysis of what makes modern man tick, starting with his wallet."
Shermer (Why Darwin Matters: The Case Against Intelligent Design, 2006, etc.) applies his knowledge of evolutionary science to the volatile topic of modern economics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 9, 2018

"Not a polemic but an ingenious popular-science account of how we deal with mortality."
An exploration of "one of the most profound questions of the human condition, one that has driven theologians, philosophers, scientists, and all thinking people to try to understand the meaning and purpose of our life as mortal beings and discover how we can transcend our mortality." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Feb. 2, 2004

"Thought-provoking and well-honed examination of deep questions."
Imagine there's no Heaven (as John Lennon suggested): what, then, is the foundation for morality? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 20, 2014

"A well-documented but perhaps overly optimistic view of a future likely to be challenged by both environmentalists and religious fundamentalists."
Skeptic magazine founding publisher Shermer (The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies—How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths, 2011, etc.) reviews the last 400 years of human history to substantiate his claim that it is science and reason, not religion, that reveal a path to "the betterment of humanity in a civilized state."Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 1, 2011

"A timely, reasoned reflection on the nature of belief, offering a level-headed corrective to the divisiveness of extreme partisanship."
Skeptic magazine founding publisher Shermer (The Mind of the Market: Compassionate Apes, Competitive Humans, and Other Tales from Evolutionary Economics, 2007, etc.) writes entertainingly about the scientific basis of belief. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"A useful companion to Wallace's—and Darwin's—own writings, and a fine contribution to the history of science."
A scholarly appraisal of the curious life and work of the naturalist who, some insist, was the true father of the theory of evolution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKEPTIC by Michael Shermer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 12, 2016

"Dense with facts, convincing arguments, and curious statistics, this is an ingenious collection of light entertainment for readers who believe that explaining stuff is a good idea."
A collection of 75 of the Scientific American columns by author and gadfly Shermer (The Moral Arc: How Science and Reason Lead Humanity Toward Truth, Justice, and Freedom, 2015, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 5, 2005

"Full of light, but short on fire."
A wide-ranging if tepid collection of 14 essays by the publisher of Skeptic magazine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 8, 2006

"A valuable, clearly presented tool in a key modern controversy."
A leading skeptic takes on the religious right. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

MICHAEL NESMITH
by Nick A. Zaino III

Michael Nesmith’s first big job in the music industry didn’t make much sense to him. He was hired—along with Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork—to be part of a rock and roll band on television called the Monkees. It would change his life in ways he couldn’t quite comprehend. He addresses this in his new memoir, Infinite Tuesday: An ...


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BLOG POST

MICHAEL FRANK
by Marjorie Baumgarten

Perhaps you recognize the names of Irving Ravetch and Harriet Frank Jr. A married couple, they were Hollywood screenwriters responsible for authoring such Oscar-nominated classics as Hud and Norma Rae. Active from the late Forties through the mid-Eighties, the collaborators built a reputation for quality scripts based on their eight films with maverick filmmaker Martin Ritt and their screen adaptations ...


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BLOG POST

MICHAEL TWITTY
by Gregory McNamee

Recipes, like people, have DNA. It may take some ferreting out, some hard kitchen testing, some documentary research, and some more tasting and adjusting, but eventually that yellowed slip of paper tucked into grandmom’s copy of Joy of Cooking will yield its ancestry, reveal its origins through the patina of the past, and show how tastes and ingredients have changed ...


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