Search Results: "Michael Silverstein"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2012

"A quirky, sharp and depressing analysis of the current state of campaigning."
Anthropological take on the centrality of "message" to American presidential politics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 10, 1993

"Unlike many well-intentioned books on the subject, this is cogent, clear, jargon free—a pleasure to read."
A provocative, intelligent defense of the science of ``enomics''—defined as a new and growing set of links between ``green'' thinking and corporate profitability—by Silverstein (The Environmental Factor, 1989—not reviewed), former advisor to the Clinton/Gore campaign. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEARNING ABOUT AIDS by Alvin Silverstein
Released: Feb. 1, 1989

Trying to involve readers, the authors begin by inadvertently fostering stereotypical fears: there's a lot of whispering; perhaps you notice that your mother no longer kisses your fatigued uncle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LAFCADIO, THE LION WHO SHOT BACK by Shel Silverstein
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 28, 1963

"Artful, Thurber-like sketches by the author on nearly every text page form a bit of high level nonsense."
When the other lions roused themselves and padded off at a trot, one lion asked "why". Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO WANTS A CHEAP RHINOCEROS? by Shel Silverstein
ANIMALS
Released: May 8, 1964

"In spite of the tempering with the temperance taboo, the book is still good juvenile nonsense."
The work of Uncle Shelby seems to be a special taste. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SICK GIRL by Amy Silverstein
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Sets the record straight about a so-called medical miracle."
A young woman's revealing memoir of life after a heart transplant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERY THING ON IT by Shel Silverstein
POETRY
Released: Sept. 20, 2011

"Adults who grew up with Uncle Shelby will find themselves wiping their eyes by the time they get to the end of this collection; children new to the master will find themselves hooked. (Poetry. All ages)"
A second posthumous collection from the archives of the multitalented Silverstein is definitely a cause for celebration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNNY BABBIT by Shel Silverstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2005

"Like the humor, the simple line drawings accompanying each poem are vintage Silverstein—so, gip, don't sulp, and enjoy this unexpected lagniappe from one of the greats. (Poetry. 7-11)"
Described as "a work in progress for over twenty years," this posthumous gathering of new verses and line drawings plays too long on a single trope, but makes a real knee-slapper in small doses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FALLING UP by Shel Silverstein
POETRY
Released: May 31, 1996

"Readers chortling their way through this inspired assemblage of cautionary tales, verbal hijinks, and thoughtful observations, deftly inserted, will find the temptation to read parts of it aloud irresistible. (index) (Poetry. 7+)"
Well, finally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUNNY BABBIT RETURNS by Shel Silverstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 19, 2017

"Cead with rare and lave a good haugh; there can't be too many more like these. (Poetry. 6-12)"
Twelve years later, a return to the ween groods for more vunny ferses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC by Shel Silverstein
POETRY
Released: Oct. 7, 1982

"All in all, bright and knowing nonsense."
A fat volume of small illustrated rhymes from Silverstein, who gets down to the level of kids' peeves, spooks, and sense of silliness often enough to score a collective hit. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MISSING PIECE by Shel Silverstein
FAIRY TALES, FOLKTALES AND MYTHS
Released: April 14, 1976

"However, the very childlike sparseness of words and lines at least leaves room for application without forcing any—and we'll take 'its' approach to life over that of Silverstein's Giving Tree any day."
The journey, not the arrival matters. . . to the extent that once Silverstein's freehand circular "it" finds the pie-shaped missing piece it's been seeking all along, it decides to do without it—for when the wedge-like gap that had functioned as a sort of mouth is filled in, "it" is unable to sing. Read full book review >