Search Results: "Michel Van Zeveren"


BOOK REVIEW

THAT'S MINE by Michel Van Zeveren
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2013

"A long, drawn-out setup that leads to a punch line so understated many kids won't get it. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Exactly what's inside that little egg left unattended in the mighty jungle? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZEE IS NOT SCARED by Michel Gay
ANIMALS
Released: March 22, 2004

"Sleep tight. (Picture book. 4-6)"
Little Zee (2003) returns for a night's horseplay (okay, zebraplay) with his parents. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ZEE by Michel Gay
by Michel Gay, illustrated by Michel Gay
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 18, 2003

"Charming from A to Zee. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Anxious for his parents to wake up so he can climb in bed for a snuggle, Zee tries to serve them breakfast in bed. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1997

"The only thing that blows harder than a high Tibetan wind is Peissel himself. (8 pages color photos, not seen)"
Potentially fascinating rambles in remote Tibet are trashed by Peissel's (The Secret War in Tibet, 1973, etc.) chest-thumping and gratuitous opining. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDER THE LIGHT by Sam Michel
Released: June 13, 1991

"A new voice from the West, in thrall to fictional fashion but beginning to find its way to originality."
Fifteen stories, set in Montana and Nevada: part Hemingway sparseness, part lush poetry that's sometimes overwritten—two kinds of fiction seen recently in the pages of The Quarterly, where several of these first appeared. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Feb. 15, 1996

"In light of the post-Soviet availability of KGB and GRU files, however, he makes a credible, compelling case for a multinational inquiry into the true circumstances of the puzzling crash."
Brun, a French-Canadian pilot with a bent for aeronautical forensics, is the latest to challenge official explanations of the disappearance of Korean Air Lines flight 007 (with 269 aboard) during a 1983 run from Anchorage to Tokyo. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNDER THE SKIN by Michel Faber
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: July 1, 2000

"The process of procurement is duly horrific, but the procurer's transformation from ruthless to compassionate, even with the conventional budding-romance twist, provides a more compelling dimension—and it's enhanced by the superbly evoked imagery of the Highlands."
An eerie debut novel from Faber, Dutch-born, turns the Scottish Highlands into a landscape from The Twilight Zone as Scotland's brawny best meet their match in the diminutive Isserly, who takes many of them on a short ride from which there's no return. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VANILLA BRIGHT LIKE EMINEM by Michel Faber
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2007

"Minor work from the author of The Courage Consort (2004, etc.), though animated by a polished, oddly engaging nastiness."
Eccentrics, misfits, sociopaths and outright criminals populate the cosmopolitan (Dutch-born, now Scottish) author's sleek, disturbing, gruesomely funny short stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOOK OF STRANGE NEW THINGS by Michel Faber
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 28, 2014

"What would Jesus do if he wore a space helmet? A profoundly religious exploration of inner turmoil, and one sure to irk the Pat Robertson crowd in its insistence on the primacy of humanity."
A long-awaited—and brilliant and disquieting—novel of faith and redemption by Scotland-based writer Faber (The Crimson Petal and the White, 2002, etc.).Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A DEMON'S ULTIMATUM by Michel Bastaros

"A horror tale by a gifted storyteller that, despite minor flaws, delivers a wickedly good ending."
A Texas woman considers accepting a demon's proposal of marriage in order to save her family in Bastaros' (Life Near the Sea, 2011) supernatural thriller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG APE by Michel Butor
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: July 15, 1995

"It's easy to see from this dense but unrewarding text why the French New Wave in fiction is now left to academics, who may have a penchant for such pointless curiosities."
Butor's self-styled ``caprice,'' first published in 1967 in France, is an autobiographical fiction in vintage nouveau roman style—though the refracted, elliptical, thickly descriptive narrative isn't all that ``new'' anymore. Read full book review >