Search Results: "Michelle Black"


BOOK REVIEW

SOLOMON SPRING by Michelle Black
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2002

"Black (An Uncommon Enemy, not reviewed) serves up a Western in which a beautiful, anachronistic heroine rises above American sexism, imperialism, capitalism, and racism, all so that she and her true love can be together."
Once upon a time in the West, Eden Murdoch and Brad Randall met and fell in love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SÉANCE IN SEPIA by Michelle Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Oct. 21, 2011

"Historical novelist Black (The Second Glass of Absinthe, 2003, etc.) is awkward at dialogue but dandy at plotting. And three cheers for Victoria Woodhull, whose place in the feminist pantheon is richly deserved."
Real-life feminist Victoria Woodhull experiences the fictional consequences of free love. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECOND GLASS OF ABSINTHE by Michelle Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Kit and Bella are appealing, eccentric ingénues in an unappealingly politically correct tale from Black (Solomon Spring, 2002, etc.)."
How the West was drunk, framed, and turned fugitive. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

WILD THINGS
by Julie Danielson

Because children possess an inner wildness, children’s literature is full of wild creatures of all sorts and stripes. Two brand-new picture books on shelves, all about wildness, serve as the yin and yang of one another – one story about a tame creature finding wildness; another about a wild creature seeking security.

Michelle Cuevas’s Smoot: A Rebellious Shadow, illustrated by ...


Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 20, 2007

"Bedside reading for Karl Rove wannabes preparing for 2008."
Why have recent US national elections been so close? It's the regions, stupid. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLESSED ARE YOU by Michelle Edwards
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 18, 1993

"These vigorously limned, unabashedly homely kids might be cousins of the ones in Edwards's Alef-bet (1992); again, the bright, harmonious colors and the warmth and energy of the design bespeak a productive, loving, and devout family. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 2-8)"
Thirteen brief prayers in Edwards's translations, which she uses with her own children, plus the original Hebrew and a transliteration, all appearing on versos elaborately bordered with a vine-like motif that echoes the Hebrew script and also incorporates appropriate symbols—e.g., for the prayer beginning, ``God, grant us peace and goodness,'' Edwards includes a dove, a rainbow, and a menorah. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VALIANT by Holly Black
FICTION
Released: June 1, 2005

"Val's story, while not the best of the genre, makes for a compelling, edgy read complete with faerie murders and shaven-headed heroines. (Fantasy. YA)"
Murdered mermaids, runaways addicted to magical drugs and trolls inhabit a New York City that draws heavily on the conventions of urban fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE POISON EATERS AND OTHER STORIES by Holly Black
FANTASY
Released: Feb. 1, 2010

"Sly humor, vivid characters, each word perfectly chosen: These stories deserve reading again and again. (Short stories/fantasy. 13 & up)"
Black's first story collection assures her place as a modern fantasy master. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"To be continued. (Fiction. YA)"
Laugh-out-loud funny, this engaging, high-concept novel about a 17-year-old boy's world, both real and imaginary, is a story that teases, building up reader suspense and expectation then refusing to deliver. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A VOW OF CHASTITY by Veronica Black
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: April 7, 1992

"Endless replays of the convent's daily routines and the less- than-credible plot weaken a sporadically interesting story, which lacks the cohesion of the series debut, Vow of Silence."
A second story featuring impulsive, thirtysomething Sister Joan, a nun in the Order of the Daughters of Compassion, who lives in the Order's convent in the Cornwall countryside and teaches a small class of children from local farms and the nearby gypsy community, along with newcomer Samantha Olive, whose writer father has bought an old house in the area. Read full book review >