Search Results: "Michelle Magorian"


BOOK REVIEW

NOT A SWAN by Michelle Magorian
FICTION
Released: Aug. 30, 1992

The author of Good Night, Mr. Tom (1982) returns to WW II with a story about three genteel British sisters, on their own when the woman hired to care for them is suddenly drafted. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JUST HENRY by Michelle Magorian
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Clearly drawn heroes and villains, a wildly engaging cast of young people and older ones and all sorts of fascinating bits about movies, cameras, music and life in postwar England all make up this sparkling tale. (Historical fiction. 10-15)"
Henry lives with his mother, stepfather, Gran and little sister. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICHELLE OBAMA by Peter Slevin
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 7, 2015

"Slevin delivers a somewhat fawning portrait, but when necessary, he is willing to criticize and reveal his subject's missteps."
A Chicago-based journalist probes the fortunate yet humble upbringing of the first lady and, in a tedious refrain, her effective blackness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 10, 2017

"While writing about the first lady, most of these perceptive essayists are also writing about themselves and their country, showing the shifts in perception and possibility that she has helped inspire."
A collection of essays that genuflect before a first lady like no other. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MICHELLE CARTLIDGE'S BOOK OF WORDS by Michelle Cartlidge
ANIMALS
Released: Oct. 1, 1994

"The only surprises here are disappointing. (Fiction/Picture book. 2-6)"
In this standard word book from Cartlidge (A Mouses's Diary, 1982, etc.), a family of mice are followed through some typical events: getting dressed, going to school, shopping, attending a birthday party for Brother Mouse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CONFESSIONS OF AN IMAGINARY FRIEND by Michelle Cuevas
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2015

"Though the writing is clever and there are plenty of amusing incidents included, life lessons and existential truths overwhelm everything, suggesting that the audience for this uneasy amalgam of whimsy and wisdom will be small. (Fiction. 8-10)"
An imaginary friend who yearns to be real learns about life along with the children who conjure him up in a variety of guises. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TALENT SHOW by Michelle Edwards
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"An author's note detailing more strategies for overcoming stage fright follows the text. (Easy reader. 6-9)"
Jackson Magnet School is having a talent show and Howardina Geraldina Paulina Maxina Gardenia Smith is determined to be the star. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2000

"An attractive title for display or reading, this should have a wide audience. (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
An alphabet of dolls from many countries and time periods displays each with a handsome full-page photograph accompanied by a brief description. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALEF-BET by Michelle Edwards
ABC BOOKS
Released: May 15, 1992

"Hebrew words—ice cream, airplane—have been made from ancient words, but without further elucidation), a notably cheerful first introduction. (Nonfiction. 4-8)"
In exuberant illustrations with vibrant colors vigorously defined by agile, rough lines, Edwards depicts an endearingly ordinary family engaged in everyday activities—helping Dad with the laundry, imaginative play, outings—with the oldest of three children taking part in everything from his wheelchair. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLESSED ARE YOU by Michelle Edwards
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 18, 1993

"These vigorously limned, unabashedly homely kids might be cousins of the ones in Edwards's Alef-bet (1992); again, the bright, harmonious colors and the warmth and energy of the design bespeak a productive, loving, and devout family. (Nonfiction/Picture book. 2-8)"
Thirteen brief prayers in Edwards's translations, which she uses with her own children, plus the original Hebrew and a transliteration, all appearing on versos elaborately bordered with a vine-like motif that echoes the Hebrew script and also incorporates appropriate symbols—e.g., for the prayer beginning, ``God, grant us peace and goodness,'' Edwards includes a dove, a rainbow, and a menorah. Read full book review >