Search Results: "Michelle Tea"


BOOK REVIEW

HOW TO GROW UP by Michelle Tea
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 27, 2015

"An engaging and often darkly funny memoir. Life begins at 40 for the author, who got a late start on adulthood and had a wild time getting there."
A memoir about how sobriety helped a recovering alcoholic belatedly become an adult. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BLACK WAVE by Michelle Tea
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 13, 2016

"A biting, sagacious, and delightfully dark metaliterary novel about finding your way in a world on fire."
Churning through lovers, baggies, and bottles, writer Michelle Leduski runs for LA with the end of the world on her heels. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE OF NO MAN’S LAND by Michelle Tea
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 14, 2006

"The novel shines with a kind of beatnik deference to drugs and lust and dangerous youth."
San Francisco hipster-girl Tea pens a novel of teenage angst. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GIRL AT THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA by Michelle Tea
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 21, 2014

"Much less grim than the series opener, with plenty of mermaid appeal for readers happy with lyrical but overlong musings. (Fantasy. 13-16)"
This second installment in the Chelsea Trilogy takes its 13-year-old heroine on a journey from urban blight through deep-sea magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Unflinching annals of commodity-driven colonialism."
A penchant for imperial nostalgia serves the author of The Great Hedge of India (2001) well in exploring centuries of the British lust for tea and a far-flung empire of exotic acreage on which to grow it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERMAID IN CHELSEA CREEK by Michelle Tea
YOUNG ADULT
Released: May 21, 2013

"The ornate literary style and grim themes make this read more like a story about adolescence for adults than one aimed at actual teens. (Magical realism. 12 & up)"
An avant-garde author's fantasy debut is exquisitely written but draining in its unrelenting ugliness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEA by Stacey D’Erasmo
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 14, 2000

"An intermittently moving debut that tries too hard to be literary. Nonetheless, D'Erasmo is a writer to watch."
An evocative yet somewhat contrived first novel about a young suburban woman dealing with her mother's suicide and her own lesbianism. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 2004

"If 300-plus pages of beautiful boys, speed freaks in the Castro, girlie-girl orgies, and Allen Ginsberg's dancing boyfriend sounds like your kind of ride, then get on—but expect some bumps."
"Sex, Drugs and Kink in the Bay Area": an alternate title for this largely unexceptional anthology. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TEA by D.A. Powell
Released: March 27, 1998

"This ambitious debut would have benefitted from some formal promiscuity."
paper 0-8195-6335-8 Explaining in prose what your poetry isn—t is not the best way to introduce a first volume, even if you rightly suspect that your work will be reduced to its surfaces as a series of elegies for victims of AIDS, which this is, but only in part. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COAL TO DIAMONDS by Beth Ditto
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 9, 2012

"A frank, forthright memoir that provides a new perspective on a familiar theme."
A memoir from the lead singer of the band Gossip, chronicling her upbringing in rural Arkansas. Read full book review >