Search Results: "Mike Ornstein"


BOOK REVIEW

THE DADDY LONGLEGS BLUES by Mike Ornstein
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"The jazzy poem will be fun for sharing. (Picture book. 5-8)"
"Bounce with The Daddy as he plays his fiddle. He's eight long legs with a dot in the middle." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROOTS OF THE SELF by Robert Ornstein
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1993

"Unusual roots, worth chewing on—but more weeding would have helped. (Illustrated with 40 cartoonish line drawings by Ted Dewan)"
From ebullient popular-science writer Ornstein (The Evolution of Consciousness, 1991, etc.): a theory of human nature, based on recent studies in child development, brain structure, personality, and genetics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1991

"Yet another Cartesian stage manager, as Dennett might say?"
Writing with the same infectious enthusiasm that invests his much of his other work, Ornstein (coauthor, Healthy Pleasures, 1989; Multimind, 1986, etc.) replays familiar themes, adding some new twists. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1997

"Accessible and provocative, but surely not the last word. (Author tour)"
From the author of The Evolution of Consciousness (1991) and other popular works on the human mind, a revealing account of his own and others' prior misunderstandings about the right and left brains, a concise summary of current knowledge, and some provocative speculations about the development and functioning of the two hemispheres. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 12, 1995

"The beauty of this book lies in the conjuring of those innovative moments, beautifully woven, entertaining vignettes that explain where the changes came from, the trouble they caused, and where they led."
A Cook's tour of humankind's great innovations and the glories and tribulations that came in their wake. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SKY-HIGH SUKKAH by Rachel Ornstein Packer
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 4, 2016

"Beyond explaining the holiday's significance, Leah's story will serve to illustrate Judaism's model of kehilla (community), in which cooperative spirit brings people together. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-7)"
Friends and neighbors help apartment dweller Leah figure out a way to build a communal sukkah for the autumn holiday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OUTFOXED by Mike Twohy
by Mike Twohy, illustrated by Mike Twohy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 24, 2013

"A goose egg. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Cartoonist Twohy delivers lackluster laughs in this tale of a clever duck and not-too-bright fox. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A TIGER TAIL by Mike  Boldt
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 5, 2016

"Anya isn't the only kid who worries about being different on the first day; no matter how unique, though, readers are sure to find a niche to call their own. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Anya doesn't seem at all worried that it's the start of a new school year, but the tiger tail she's sprouted overnight is a huge cause for concern. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LITTLE ELLIOT, FALL FRIENDS by Mike Curato
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 29, 2017

"A yummy, happy resolution—perfectly delectable to the preschool crowd. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Little Elliot (a small, white pachyderm with pastel polka dots) and his bestie, Mouse, need a respite from the big city's grating sounds, slightly sickening smells, and frenetic pace. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUSEUM MYSTERY SQUAD AND THE CASE OF THE HIDDEN HIEROGLYPHICS by Mike Nicholson
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2017

"The historical information is a bit flimsy, but deduction and slick detective work save the day. (Mystery. 7-9)"
In their latest caper, four young sleuths (counting the hamster) not only uncover a hidden treasure, but foil its theft. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Aug. 1, 2006

"Most of the criticism here goes to Republicans—largely because they are in power—but the wealth of detail offered by Mann and Ornstein gives partisanship a good name."
The United States Congress has ceased to be a deliberative body, according to two eminent political scientists with some ideas about how to fix it. Read full book review >