Search Results: "Mike Reiss"


BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"Readers hoping for some rougher cautionary mayhem will be disappointed, but try this on James Proimos fans. (Illustrated fiction. 8-10)"
Scoring middling-high marks for child appeal if not really delivering on the title's promise, a veteran writer for The Simpsons offers two original tales about bad behavior followed by just deserts and another that celebrates thinking outside the (fashion) box. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SANTA CLAUSTROPHOBIA by Mike Reiss
Released: Sept. 1, 2002

"This will work well as a read-aloud for older kids, and of course, as an ideal Christmas gift for any therapist who doesn't shrink from irreverent humor. (Picture book. 6+)"
American holidays are the characters in this witty seasonal tale, the second Christmas story collaboration by Reiss and Catrow (How Murray Saved Christmas, not reviewed). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LATE FOR SCHOOL by Mike Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Children tardy and timely alike will laugh at this droll recitation. (Picture book. 7-9)"
In the fine tradition of John Burningham's John Patrick Norman McHennessy, The Boy Who Was Always Late (1988), a New York lad overcomes—or so he claims—all sorts of unusual obstacles to get to school, from a flood in Times Square to a Hyundai-eating robot from Mars. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO WOULDN’T SHARE by Mike Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2008

"Kids will relish the illustrations and get a guffaw or two, though, and that can't be all bad. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Even Catrow's flamboyantly over-the-top art can't completely rescue this superficial cautionary tale from the heap of mediocre, heavy-handed takes on the theme. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BOY WHO LOOKED LIKE LINCOLN by Mike Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Dec. 1, 2003

"Ludicrous fun. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Benjy looks like Abraham Lincoln as only Catrow can evoke. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MERRY UN-CHRISTMAS by Mike Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2006

"He incorporates witty asides into store signs and newspapers ads ('Only three more shopping days till Un-Christmas') for some additional chuckles. (Picture book. 4-9)"
Christmas celebrations? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 18, 2012

"A rarefied, intimate literary study delineating a roiling revolutionary era."
A compelling new work by literary detective Reiss (The Orientalist: Solving the Mystery of a Strange and Dangerous Life, 2005) tracks the wildly improbable career of Alexandre Dumas' mixed-race father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2004

"Reiss has reworked material from an earlier paperback series here, and the result, while a bit long, delivers a good dose of shivery entertainment. (Fiction. 11-14)"
Reiss's deliciously creepy tale is a solid addition to the haunted dollhouse genre. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAINT BY MAGIC by Kathryn Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"Fans of Reiss's Time Windows (1991) will step right into this 'Time Travel Mystery.' (Fiction. 10-14)"
A palette with daubs of time travel, artists, magic, evil, and possession paints an intriguing mystery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIME WINDOWS by Kathryn Reiss
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 1991

"Well wrought and entertaining. (Fiction. 10- 14)"
When Miranda, 13, and her parents come to live in Massachusetts, Miranda finds an old dollhouse, a replica of their new home, in the attic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROAD TO EXTREMA by Bob Reiss
NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1992

"Lively, informative journalism."
In this captivating and original exploration of the state of the global ecosystem, journalist and novelist Reiss (Flamingo, 1989, Saltmaker, 1988) travels between New York and the Amazon rain forest, the better to underscore the critical interdependency between the two worlds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PURGATORY ROAD by Bob Reiss
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Feb. 12, 1996

"Despite intentions good enough to pave an alternate route to hell, a preachy tract largely unredeemed by entertainment value."
A banal chiller from Reiss (The Last Spy, 1993, etc.), this set at an American research base in Antarctica, in which a lone scientist battles the elements, colleagues, and superiors to solve the deeper mystery of his sister's death. Read full book review >