Search Results: "Milton Meltzer"


BOOK REVIEW

MILTON by Anna Beer
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"A well-researched, graceful account of the life of a literary giant."
Rich, often laudatory biography of the creator of Paradise Lost. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Black-and-white photographs add a visual side, but most effective is a calendar detailing each separate step toward freedom during this time period. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
An accessible and vivid outline of the events that led to changes in civil rights in the US from 1940 through 1968. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COLUMBUS AND THE WORLD AROUND HIM by Milton Meltzer
BIOGRAPHY
Released: March 1, 1990

"The many historical illustrations and maps are less well captioned and reproduced than those in the Levinson biography (above), but the more abundant and specific detail here—as well as Meltzer's unique blend of clarity, wisdom, and compassion—makes this the better of two fine books."
Meltzer, a recent Jane Addams Book Award honoree who has made a specialty of social history for young people, presents the hero of 1492 as a persuasive visionary, a gifted navigator—and a disastrous administrator who was typical of his time in his callous exploitation of native people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE CHINESE AMERICANS by Milton Meltzer
Released: Oct. 1, 1981

"Written for easy assimilation, but with no loss of impact and a contained indignation that gives it an edge over other entries at this level."
The next thing to slave labor, Chinese workers were imported by the thousands to build the Western end of the transcontinental railroad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"That the worst economic crisis of our nation's history might be remembered as a relative boon to artists (giving them a freedom for which many paid dearly during the McCarthy era) is a multi-layered irony which Meltzer reinforces here with closing statistics on the 'starvation diet' of the arts today."
The WPA gave Milton Meltzer his first writing job (in the Theater Project at a life-saving $23.86 a week), so this is an understandably glowing, nostalgic recollection of that agency's accomplishments. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT by Milton Meltzer
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1972

"Meltzer presents the historical evidence and often relies on his readers to draw the correct conclusions from excerpted testimony; still he covers a lot of ground and those who are able to keep up with him should be well rewarded."
A passionate, far ranging defense of the Fifth Amendment protection of the right to remain silent which goes back to the origins of its systematic violation during the inquisition (where the self-incriminating confession served as both the charge and the proof of guilt) and its gradual establishment as a principle of English common law through the struggles of political prisoners such as leveler John Lilbourne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 14, 1968

"The casual but forceful thrust of his poetry, a recurrent concern for the mulatto, his tremendous versatility, the uncompromising posture are affirmed in a highly sympathetic but nevertheless reliable account of his life."
"To my mind it is the duty of the younger Negro artist. . . to change through the force of his art that old whispering 'I want to be white,' hidden in the aspiration of his people, to 'Why should I want to be white? I am a Negro—and beautiful!'" That was the twenty-four-year-old Hughes writing in The Nation in 1926 and it is an early sign of an integrity that he maintained throughout his life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1964

"This biography was carefully researched and written so that a life of adventurous ideas reads with as such verve as any career on the battlefield."
There seems to have been no humanitarian cause of the 19th century on which Samuel Gridley Howe did not take the unpopular stance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"Uneven, but a horizon-broadener for readers already well grounded in recent history."
A thematic survey of recent US history, with passages from contemporary observers and participants briefly introduced and arranged under nine rubrics: the cold war; Korea and Vietnam; civil rights; immigrants and refugees; the rising tide of environmental consciousness, etc. The extracts are generally well chosen, though some are more effective than others: Elizabeth Eckford's terror-filled first day at Little Rock's Central High in 1957 and Hank Thomas's experiences as a Freedom Rider are vividly described; but excerpts from Michael Harrington's The Other America and Carson's Silent Spring, however impassioned, are too general to excite much response. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 30, 1990

A cogent survey of the historical roots of the fast ten amendments; how they were written "to strengthen the democratic standard of equality proclaimed as a self-evident truth in the Declaration of Independence"; and a brief exposition of each of their provisions, followed by more detailed accounts of how these have fared in the last 200 years. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NONFICTION
Released: Oct. 30, 1990

"An excellent source that also makes engrossing reading."
A cogent survey of the historical roots of the fast ten amendments; how they were written "to strengthen the democratic standard of equality proclaimed as a self-evident truth in the Declaration of Independence"; and a brief exposition of each of their provisions, followed by more detailed accounts of how these have fared in the last 200 years. Read full book review >