Search Results: "Milton Meltzer"


BOOK REVIEW


"Uneven, but a horizon-broadener for readers already well grounded in recent history."
A thematic survey of recent US history, with passages from contemporary observers and participants briefly introduced and arranged under nine rubrics: the cold war; Korea and Vietnam; civil rights; immigrants and refugees; the rising tide of environmental consciousness, etc. The extracts are generally well chosen, though some are more effective than others: Elizabeth Eckford's terror-filled first day at Little Rock's Central High in 1957 and Hank Thomas's experiences as a Freedom Rider are vividly described; but excerpts from Michael Harrington's The Other America and Carson's Silent Spring, however impassioned, are too general to excite much response. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RIGHT TO REMAIN SILENT by Milton Meltzer
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1972

"Meltzer presents the historical evidence and often relies on his readers to draw the correct conclusions from excerpted testimony; still he covers a lot of ground and those who are able to keep up with him should be well rewarded."
A passionate, far ranging defense of the Fifth Amendment protection of the right to remain silent which goes back to the origins of its systematic violation during the inquisition (where the self-incriminating confession served as both the charge and the proof of guilt) and its gradual establishment as a principle of English common law through the struggles of political prisoners such as leveler John Lilbourne. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HUMAN RIGHTS BOOK by Milton Meltzer
NONFICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 1979

"With texts of several human fights documents appended, a valuable resource."
With the strength and specificity that is missing from the Loeschers' Human Rights (p. 333, J-43), Meltzer takes a sober look at human rights violations in today's world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW


"Though he lists remedies available to ordinary citizens, when corporate executives steal apple juice from babies it's hard not to be distrustful."
Noted social historian/author Meltzer tackles an overwhelming task describing today's broad range of criminal behavior. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1974

"A well made introduction for those who need a bridge to the standard works Meltzer introduces."
This survey of Eastern European Jewry was prompted by Meltzer's desire to investigate the background his immigrant parents never talked about. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"75 titles in his well selected bibliography."
While the vivid, first-hand memories of struggle and triumph—of William Zorach, Maurice Hindus, Mary Antin, Abraham Cahan, and others—are the backbone of this sequel to his documentary World of Our Fathers (1974), Meltzer isn't content with celebrating the success stories. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY
Released: Jan. 20, 1969

"As viewed by the victims and by writers as diverse as Anna Arnold Hedgeman and Edmund Wilson (and counterpinted by bland quotes from the mass media), the depression hits home, and hurts."
The depression's rueful plaint is affixed to a graphic, sometimes scorching documentary history of "how it started and why, and what it felt like." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TERRORISTS by Milton Meltzer
Released: Nov. 1, 1983

"Brisk, knowledgeable, incisive."
Political terrorism without equivocation—taking off from the Brink's holdup and shootout. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1963

Milton Meltzer, who edited A Thoreau Profile (see p. 1023, 1962) with Walter Harding, here presents Thoreau in his own words as a social thinker. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 1, 2001

"Black-and-white photographs add a visual side, but most effective is a calendar detailing each separate step toward freedom during this time period. (Nonfiction. 10-14)"
An accessible and vivid outline of the events that led to changes in civil rights in the US from 1940 through 1968. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 15, 1964

"This biography was carefully researched and written so that a life of adventurous ideas reads with as such verve as any career on the battlefield."
There seems to have been no humanitarian cause of the 19th century on which Samuel Gridley Howe did not take the unpopular stance. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1976

"That the worst economic crisis of our nation's history might be remembered as a relative boon to artists (giving them a freedom for which many paid dearly during the McCarthy era) is a multi-layered irony which Meltzer reinforces here with closing statistics on the 'starvation diet' of the arts today."
The WPA gave Milton Meltzer his first writing job (in the Theater Project at a life-saving $23.86 a week), so this is an understandably glowing, nostalgic recollection of that agency's accomplishments. Read full book review >