Search Results: "Miriam Forster"


BOOK REVIEW

EMPIRE OF SHADOWS by Miriam Forster
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Nov. 4, 2014

"Uneven and unsatisfying. (Fantasy. 13-18)"
A young bodyguard in search of redemption finds love and court intrigue in this Asian-influenced fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CITY OF A THOUSAND DOLLS by Miriam Forster
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 5, 2013

"Memorable but bumpy. (Fantasy. 11-15)"
A vivid but uneven debut takes place in an Asian-blend fantasy world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: April 7, 1994

"For all her familiarity with the life and works, Beauman's approach, tone, and style are simply inappropriate."
Believing that Forster (1879-1970) wrote ``five of the greatest novels in our language,'' Beauman (A Very Great Profession—not reviewed, on women novelists) argues that they are the product of his long period of sexual repression, that finding ``sexual happiness'' at age 40 put an end to his fiction, turning him into a journalist, a sage, an academic, and a ``Closet Queen'' who spent his latter years in an extended furtive relationship with a bisexual married police officer. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: July 10, 1947

"For a rather special intellectual market."
For most readers, Forster is identified with A Passage to India (1924)- which those who haven't read intend some day to read, and those who have intend to reread. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRIAM IN THE DESERT by Jacqueline Jules
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2010

"They effectively match the original and simple dialogue-driven text. (author's note) (Picture book. 4-7)"
Miriam, Moses's sister, is featured in the fourth in Jules's Bible series, offering encouragement and guidance to the Israelites as they continue their seemingly endless thirst- and hunger-filled journey through the desert following their escape from Egypt. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRIAM, EVER WATCHFUL by Ann Letzter
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 12, 2012

"A well-intentioned but awkwardly executed rendition of a biblical tale."
A retelling of the biblical story of Miriam for young readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MIRIAM THE MEDIUM by Rochelle Jewel Shapiro
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 11, 2004

"With a title like this, you get your money's worth."
A gently amusing debut for the Reformed set follows the financial vicissitudes of a psychic in Great Neck, Long Island, struggling to make her calling respectable among the suburban well-heeled. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Kathy, Wait For Me! by Morelle Forster
Released: Oct. 12, 2015

"A well-crafted coming-of-age novel that skillfully chronicles the trials of a lonely orphan who joins a street gang."
Forster tells the story of a girl's tumultuous life in London in this YA debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE UNKNOWN BRIDESMAID by Margaret Forster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"A carefully considered character study that digs deep to explore the ways the past can shade and shape the present."
In this dark, disquieting novel, veteran British writer Forster (Isa & May, 2011, etc.) toggles back and forth in time to explore the enduring effects of guilt on a child psychologist whose own difficult youth casts an unshakeable shadow across her adult life. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LADY'S MAID by Margaret Forster
Released: March 6, 1990

In 1844, Elizabeth Wilson, a real person mentioned in the letters of her employer, the poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning, arrived at the Barrett household in London to be lady's maid to the "invalid," Miss Elizabeth. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KEEPING THE WORLD AWAY by Margaret Forster
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Aug. 1, 2007

"An intimate, subtly crafted, satisfying read."
A haunting painting entrances the women in whose hands it falls over the course of a century. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 7, 1993

"Biography of the most exemplary kind, and, in its own way, as haunting an evocation of a troubled woman as Rebecca itself. (Thirty-three b&w photographs)"
One of those rare biographies of popular icons—in this case, the author of Rebecca—that puts truth-telling ahead of mudslinging or whitewashing. Read full book review >