Search Results: "Moira Rose Donohue"


BOOK REVIEW

ALFIE THE APOSTROPHE by Moira Rose Donohue
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2006

"Donohue earns high marks for this lively debut—pair it with Robin Pulver's Punctuation Takes a Vacation (2003, illustrated by Lynn Rowe Reed). (Picture book. 6-8)"
The lowly Apostrophe discovers that a little magic goes a long way in the Punctuation Talent Show. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PENNY AND THE PUNCTUATION BEE by Moira Rose Donohue
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2008

"For children (or, for that matter, parents) who are still hazy on the uses of the three marks, the author discusses types of sentences in an explanatory afterword. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Donohue follows up Alfie the Apostrophe (2006), illustrared by JoAnn Adinolfi, with another parade of animate punctuation—featuring this time a Period, a Question Mark and an obnoxious Exclamation Point! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE by Holly Webb
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 3, 2013

"Character and the day-to-day workings of a wealthy household overshadow magic and plot in this engaging tale of an orphan servant-girl. (Fantasy. 9-12)"
In this orphan-makes-good mystery/thriller with a magical twist, Rose and her compatriots—an apprentice magician, a spoiled 7-year-old and a shape-shifting talking cat—work together to figure out who has been kidnapping local children and come up with a plan to rescue them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE by Martin Cruz Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 1996

"The crimes here are unremarkable, but the world evoked is memorable, glowing with life. (Author tour)"
Smith (Red Square, 1992, etc.) not only sets his exuberant, sly new novel in Victorian England but goes Victorian novelists one better, conjuring up a plot device at the heart of this mystery that Dickens would envy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE AND THE LOST PRINCESS by Holly Webb
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 2014

"Enjoyable magical adventure enlivened by an engaging group of secondary characters from all backgrounds and realms. (Fantasy. 8-12)"
Rose, an orphan who works as a housemaid while studying magic, helps save a princess from an evil magician. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE by Rose Boyt
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1992

"Unsatisfying as a sexual history, and in the end one wishes Boyt could imagine a novel that has to do with something besides sex—like character and plot for starters."
An occasionally interesting but out-of-focus story about a girl-child named Rose (make what you will of the fact that the protagonist and author share a moniker), written by Sigmund Freud's great-granddaughter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOIRA ORFEI IN AIGUES-MORTES by Wayne Koestenbaum
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Koestenbaum may be reaching to combine the mad genius of Pale Fire with the florid outlaw sexuality of Jean Genet, but his narrator has neither the wit of the former nor the nuance of the latter."
From poet and cultural critic Koestenbaum (The Queen's Throat: Opera, Homosexuality, and the Mystery of Desire, 1993, etc.), a first novel made up of the lunatic rantings of ailing concert pianist Theo Mangrove. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LAST WILL OF MOIRA LEAHY by Therese Walsh
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 13, 2009

"Most alive when it focuses on the supposedly mousy twin."
First-time novelist Walsh uneasily combines a romantic adventure about a missing dagger with the psychological story of an adolescent sibling rivalry. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

INDIGO ROSE by Susan Beth Miller
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 28, 2004

"Still, despite occasional clunkiness, Miller's vernacular style is altogether winning in a story that seriously tries to examine the depression of foreign caregivers."
Personal tragedy puts a Jamaican child-care provider on the road to ruin—in a contrived, sometimes overwrought, and jazzily accented debut. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ROSE DAUGHTER by Robin McKinley
Released: Sept. 16, 1997

"While the story is full of silvery images and quotable lines, it will strike some as overlong and overblown; for others, perhaps those who were bewitched by Donna Jo Napoli's Zel (1996), it is surely the perfect book. (Fiction. 12+)"
This luxuriant retelling of the story of the Beauty and the Beast is very different from McKinley's own Beauty (1978). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRIAR ROSE by Robert Coover
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 1, 1997

"But his reluctance to finally settle for any culminating metaphor makes this unique work seem more of a collection of masterful, cerebral turns than a living, persuasive tale."
A tour de force that rings an astonishing series of changes on the familiar fairy tale of Sleeping Beauty. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RUBY ROSE by Rob Sanders
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 21, 2016

"Artistic expression clashes with classroom discipline, and neither is the winner. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Dance should be a 24/7 activity—or so believes one young fan. Read full book review >