Search Results: "Molly Knight Raskin"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Bittersweet but celebratory."
An account of the tragically brief life of mathematician Danny Lewin (1970-2001), whose innovative algorithms "[changed] the Internet forever." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: July 14, 2015

"With acumen, Knight delivers an elegant précis of a baseball team's season, and you don't have to be a Dodgers fan to enjoy it."
A searching portrait of the Los Angeles Dodgers' 2013 season, from ESPN Magazine writer Knight.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOTHING EVER HAPPENS ON MY BLOCK by Ellen Raskin
Released: March 22, 1966

"The pictorial counterpoint to Chester's claim to dissatisfaction offers hours of diversion to children who will find themselves picking out first the obvious then the many minute details, each a complex narrative in itself, as well as a graphic illustration of the sort of atmosphere that can turn a little boy into an unnoticing nobody."
Chester Filbert is the obverse of the little boy who saw it all on Mulberry Street. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIGGS & PHANTOMS by Ellen Raskin
Released: April 1, 1974

"Still a juvenile novel — however unstrung — that takes such farcical liberties with death, grief and readers' expectations is rare enough to rate a hearing, and the Figgs — all mask and gesture though they are — do come up with a few show-stopping lines."
Except for her beloved Uncle Florence Italy Figg, a 4'6" mail order book dealer who with his niece forms the Figg-Newton monster (a stunt that enables them to reach the rare and unusual books on Ebenezer Bargain's top shelf), Mona Lisa Newton has no use for her kooky relatives. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Raskin puts Hoffman into his American context and offers fascinating insight into both. (25 b&w photos, not seen)"
An insightful biography that paints provocateur extraordinaire Abbie Hoffman as the paradigm of the 1960s. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TATTOOED POTATO AND OTHER CLUES by Ellen Raskin
Released: April 28, 1975

"Strangely enough, simply by piling and tangling up ali the name games and disguises that seem at first just mechanically ludicrous, Raskin wears down your resistance, so that by the time everyone is happily united in jail you'll be laughing as inarticulately as the brain-damaged, one-eyed, deaf-mute, Isaac Bickerstaffe (formerly Frederick Schmaltz)."
"Timothy Hay sounds like a fake name," remarks the heroine—oddly, since hers is Dickory Dock, her brother is Donald Dock, and others who make their appearance at and around the Greenwich Village row house where she works include rich collector Julius Panzpresser, fellow art student George Washington III, underworld lackey Shrimps Marinara, elusive artist Roy G. Bliv (to be found not in Who's Who but in the spectrum), three Eldon F. Zyzyskczuks (an exporter on 743 East 84th St., an importer on 734 West 84th St., and a forger who takes advantage of the mix-up in their credit cards—actually, all three are one and the same), and four detectives named Winkle (the blind man), Dinkel (the derelict), Finkel (the exterminator) and Hinkle (the hippy). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SILLY SONGS AND SAD by Ellen Raskin
Released: Sept. 15, 1967

"Kids will love the look of the book, pick and choose among the pages."
Ellen Raskin is surely one of the most witty, ingenious and versatile illustrators going, and this is distinctly successful as a demonstration of her many artistic talents, less satisfying as a collection of light verses. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SPECTACLES by Ellen Raskin
Released: March 20, 1968

"You'll be tempted to take off your glasses too-Spectacles shouldn't be missed."
Chester Filbert, to whom nothing ever happens (On My Block), has a friend named Iris Fogel to whom all sorts of surprising things happen: a fire-breathing dragon turns into Greataunt Fanny (juxtaposed against house, pine tree and path): a giant pigmy nuthatch becomes Chester himself (muffled and on skis, juxtaposed against two passing cars); a fuzzy green caterpillar ("'Where?' the teacher shrieked") is Iris' class lined up in little chairs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 29, 1971

"Noel glub C blub all. . . I glub new. . . ." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWENTY-TWO, TWENTY-THREE by Ellen Raskin
Released: Aug. 18, 1976

"In our view, it's a head trip that will attract few passengers."
Unquestionably, Ellen Raskin is a genuine kook. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO, SAID SUE, SAID WHOO? by Ellen Raskin
Released: March 21, 1973

"It's fun to spot each newcomer amid the changing foliage too."
Raskin is playing with sounds as well as pictures here and it's not hard to imagine an echoing chorus wherever her cumulative caper is read aloud. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: June 1, 2009

"Engaging portrait of a journey of self-discovery, leading to the liberating knowledge that joy and freedom often come from accepting limitations."
NPR commentator Raskin's laugh-out-loud memoir yields surprising insights about belatedly growing up in his mid-30s. Read full book review >