Search Results: "Mona Lisa Harding"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 6, 2014

"Although strongly Christian-based, the methods defined here could work for others willing to buck convention and go the home-schooling route."
How a group of children attended college at an early age. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A REGULAR GUY by Mona Simpson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 14, 1996

With a bestselling debut (Anywhere But Here, 1987) followed by a shaky sequel (The Lost Father, 1991), Simpson has a lot riding on her latest effort—which proves to be a challenging but less-than- riveting saga of a girl who finally meets her larger-than-life father but has difficulty getting his attention. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEADSCARVES AND HYMENS by Mona Eltahawy
NON-FICTION
Released: April 21, 2015

"Although Eltahawy's passionate book contributes to the struggle against women's oppression, in the face of endemic misogyny, the potential for revolution seems chillingly remote."
The plight of women in the Middle East. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Under the African Sky by Mona Sehgal
Released: July 16, 2016

"A quiet but winsome African tale, in which ordinary landscapes and animals become extraordinary."
In this debut middle-grade novella, a young New Yorker's trip to South Africa takes a rousing turn once he accepts an elephant's invitation to a wondrous pond. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

LISA CAREY
by Megan Labrise

The Stolen Child may be set on a fairy-filled Irish island, but it is “Magical realism of the best kind, utterly devoid of whimsy,” according to Kirkus’ starred review.

“My friends loved that quote, ‘utterly devoid of whimsy,’ ” says author Lisa Carey, who was recently abroad in Turkey, where we reached her by phone. “They said that ...


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BLOG POST

LISA BUNKER
by Megan Labrise

Some of the best advice Lisa Bunker received for writing a book had nothing to do with writing a book.

“The best advice I ever got for naming a child was ‘use all the names you love,’ ” says Bunker, author of Felix Yz. “By the time the next kid comes along, you’ll love different names—don’t hold one for ...


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BOOK REVIEW

MY PARENTS ARE SEX MANIACS by Robyn Harding
FAMILY AND GROWING UP
Released: April 1, 2009

Eleventh grader Louise Harrison's comfortably self-centered existence turns chaotic when her younger brother discovers their father receiving fellatio from Louise's best friend Sienna's mother (a plot development that leads to the cringe-inducingly frequent use of the phrase "blow job"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RED SLAYER by Paul Harding
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: March 23, 1994

"Run-of-the-mill doings in fancy disguise."
Second in a series set in 14th-century London (after The Nightingale Gallery, 1992) featuring John Cranston, the city's loud-mouthed, wine-swilling, softhearted Lord Coroner, and his clever aide Friar Athelstan, of down-at-heel St. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ENON by Paul Harding
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 10, 2013

"Beautifully turned: Harding has defogged his style a bit and gained a stronger emotional impact from it."
The author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Tinkers (2009) returns with another striking study of family, time and mortality. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Jan. 24, 2017

"Hard-hitting and timely given Russia's continued sway in international politics as well as its documented influence over an incoming American administration that is also hostile to the press."
A chilling look at the Putin regime's murderous suppression of its critics. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NIGHTINGALE GALLERY by Paul Harding
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 22, 1992

"Clever puzzle, bustling atmosphere, and one hopes the curmudgeonly Sir John will be toned down and made more likable in future endeavors."
P.C. Doherty, writing as Harding, launches yet another historical mystery series, this one featuring a medieval coroner of Falstaffian girth and deplorable manners, Sir John Cranston, and his able assistant, Brother Athelstan, a guilt-riddled Dominican, who takes careful notes of crime scenes, interrogations, and so forth when Sir John is sleeping off a tankard or two too many. Read full book review >