Search Results: "Monica Wood"


BOOK REVIEW

MONICA by Saunders Lewis
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 31, 1997

"But Lewis is also an obtrusive writer whose digressions and summaries both vitiate this novel's artfulness and make it unlikely that Monica will ever be seen as anything more than an unusually interesting period piece."
Monica ($17.95 paperback original; Oct. 31; 120 pp.; 1-85411-195-7): The first American edition of a once-notorious 1930 novel by eminent Welsh writer Lewis (18931985), whose only foray into prose fiction was this Bovary-an tale of an unhappy housewife sustained, then betrayed, by her overheated romantic imagination. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 23, 2006

"A bit much for some readers, but certain to please the legions of woodworking aficionados."
A fact-filled celebration of wood in human history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANY BITTER THING by Monica Wood
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: May 1, 2005

"A quiet tale with epic repercussions."
A catastrophic accident forces a young Catholic wife to question the good intentions of those around her, in Wood's polished second outing (after My Only Story, 2003), set in small-town Maine Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHEN WE WERE THE KENNEDYS by Monica Wood
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 10, 2012

"Bittersweet end-of-innocence family drama."
A tender, plaintive memoir about the impact of a beloved father's demise on a blue-collar Irish Catholic family. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KILLING MONICA by Candace Bushnell
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 23, 2015

"The book's portrayal of Pandy feels both self-congratulatory and unintentionally unpleasant, the hostility toward male characters is virulent—the only good male in the book may not be one—and the sense of humor is nil."
Bushnell (One Fifth Avenue, 2008, etc.) is still playing her Sex and the City riffs in this self-referential sort-of satire about an author whose insanely popular fictional creation has taken over her life.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GRANT WOOD by R. Tripp Evans
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2010

"An overly analytical biography, but one that goes a long way toward upending assumptions about Wood's work."
A portrait of painter Grant Wood (1891-1942) as a melancholy, closeted man. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: May 12, 2009

"A perfectly paced, beautifully crafted and moving end to a memorable fantasy. (Fantasy. 10-14)"
In this finale to the Touchstone Trilogy, past and present magically converge when 12-year-old Midge completes the work begun by her great-great aunt Celandine decades before to rescue five ancient tribes of little people hiding from the human world in the woods of Mill Farm. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OLIVER'S WOOD by Sue Hendra
ANIMALS
Released: July 1, 1996

"Gouache illustrations look much like linoleum prints—blocks of bright colors, mainly blue and ocher— and the chubby animals, with their bulging white eyes, are undeniably friendly territory. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Oliver, an owl, stays up past his bedtime at the end of one night and sees something he has never seen before—the sun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Keep Santa Monica Clean by Pasha Adam
Released: July 21, 2016

"A wildly entertaining take on Hollywood and the slime beneath the sparkle."
A Los Angeles noir novel shows readers a side of the city that they don't often allow themselves to see. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WILD WOOD by Posie Graeme-Evans
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 3, 2015

"More gripping entertainment from a seasoned professional."
Revisiting the interconnected-mysteries-separated-by-centuries setup that worked so well in The Island House (2012, etc.), Graeme-Evans sends an Australian adoptee searching for her birth mother to a castle on the England-Scotland border.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SOLSTICE WOOD by Patricia A. McKillip
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: Feb. 7, 2006

"As always, McKillip writes sparely, with elegance and precision, and this time disguises her usual insufficiency of plot behind an annoying and disconcerting succession of first-person narrators."
A contemporary revisit to Lynn Hall (Winter Rose, 1996), the huge, decaying mansion surrounded by thick woods where the boundaries between our world and the magical Otherworld grow thin. Read full book review >