Search Results: "Morna Stuart"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 6, 2006

"Imaginative, piercing portrayal of a man shadowed by merciless demons."
British homeless advocate Masters crafts an unconventional biography of a man who raged not only at the dying of the light but often at the very light itself. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STUART LITTLE by E.B. White
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 17, 1945

"The story would have a real chance on its own merits without these really appallingly bad episodes."
Of course this will sell—as an E. B. White item and one that the publishers are pushing hard, playing it for an adult as well as a juvenile sale. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GLORIA STUART by Gloria Stuart
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Sept. 8, 1999

"Those who pick up this book will likely ask themselves a similar question. (Author tour)"
The elderly star of Titanic tells all—and then some. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STUART GOES TO SCHOOL by Sara Pennypacker
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2003

"Hilarious and clever. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Worrywart Stuart is back and he has something to worry about in this excellent sequel to Stuart's Cape (2002). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MOXY MAXWELL DOES NOT LOVE STUART LITTLE by Peggy Gifford
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 8, 2007

"Technique or no technique, kids will recognize Moxy—and they will love her. (Fiction. 7-11)"
A chapter-book picaresque hilariously chronicles one day in the life of almost-fourth-grader Moxy Maxwell. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE BERTIE PROJECT by Alexander McCall Smith
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"Even woolier than earlier installments—two characters following a third suspected of adultery discuss the propriety of 'alright' versus 'all right,' and another regular's fall from an upper-story window is accompanied by a summary of notable Scottish defenestrations—but just as affecting in its slow-burning way."
Forbidden love blooms at 44 Scotland St. (The Revolving Door of Life, 2016, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: April 3, 2012

"A vastly engaging, must-read mystery infused with the perfect touch of captivating conjuration—er, magic. (Mystery. 9-14)"
Wacky, funny and ever so mysterious, this clever tale hits the ground running and never lets up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

OBSCENE BODIES by Kim Benabib
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Gentle but on-target satire, then, buttressed by Benabib's copious and clearheaded knowledge of the world he portrays."
An assured debut that blends satire of the Manhattan art world with a minor-key morality tale of an art historian seduced by Soho. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAST AND LOOSE by Stuart Woods
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 18, 2017

"Finally, a tale that answers that question of why Woods' bestselling thrillers are so unthrilling: because the characters you care about are never in danger for long enough to mix a proper martini. The unusual aptness of this installment's title is presumably unintended."
A survivor of TV pitchman Nelson Knott's ruinous presidential campaign (Below the Belt, 2017) declares war on New York attorney Stone Barrington, not realizing that in addition to being smart, tough, well-heeled, well-connected, and well-groomed, Stone is immortal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VIETNAM WAR by Stuart Murray
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 4, 2017

"A powerful and illuminating overview of the war in Vietnam even though the facts fly like the detonation of an antipersonnel mine. (Nonfiction. 10-16)"
Murray provides a fact-filled tour d'horizon of the wars suffered by Vietnam from World War II to the Paris Peace Accords. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE INNOCENT HAVE NOTHING TO FEAR by Stuart Stevens
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 28, 2016

"In an era as politically mercurial as our own, even the most far-fetched events depicted here sound utterly plausible—except for maybe one thing: moderate Republicans? Really? What are those?"
That title may be the biggest of this satiric thriller's red herrings, since, as far as this book is concerned, there are no innocents in the political process. Read full book review >