Search Results: "Munro Leaf"


BOOK REVIEW

MUNRO LEAF'S FUN BOOK by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1941

"Nursery guides to a good life' — already soundly established as favorites among the small fry and big."
Omnibus volume, containing the big three,- Manners Can Be Fun, Grammer Can Be Fun, Safety Can Be Fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

READING CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 23, 1953

"All told in direct relationship to its young audience- from pre-readers who will get the idea from listening to it, to kids in the thrown of rejecting their books for funnies and TV- a perfect and humorous antidote to the many modern factors that undermine a true literacy."
Inimitably, Leaf conveys the wonder of the world of books in a way you fervently hope will captivate just one, or ten, a thousand, a million children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET'S DO BETTER by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1945

"Amusing, lively cartoons, in his particular style, make this a good companion piece- with a broader significance- for Manners Are Fun, etc. Black and white with a splash of red Humor and a barb of not always palatable truth."
Only Munro Leaf could get away with this kind of moralizing on the course of the history of War and Peace, and he manages to get his ideas across to the children, without surenting the pill. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 11, 1936

"The most original and amusing thing Leaf has done."
This has an irresistible appeal to the sense of the ridiculous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEAF by Stephen Michael King
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2009

"Wonderful squiggly line, patches of green and brown, gold and blue and fabulous use of negative white space make this a joy to reread. (Picture book. 5-9)"
A curious, curiously subversive and very pretty wordless Australian import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METRIC CAN BE FUN! by Munro Leaf
Released: May 12, 1976

"Usable, but it can't measure up to the Branley."
Though Leaf's stick figures might help demystify the subject, they don't (despite his title) make it look as much like fun as Lustig's cartoons did in Branley's similarly simple but stronger Measure with Metric last year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE PROMISES TO YOU by Munro Leaf
Released: Feb. 27, 1957

"Fine for that first course in civics, Firmly side sewn."
The basic premises of the United Nations, a body whose tasks are to prevent wars, see that all people get fair treatment and to find ways for people to live better — are given pat and plain treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 27, 1950

"Just enough detail for a young child to take — with gay little scribblings to make history really fun."
From ancient Egypt to the United Nations in a skip and a jump (with side hops in English and United States history). Mr. Leaf's whimsical style and stick-figure illustrations are justly popular, so expect a large market for this one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAM AND THE SUPERDROOP by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1948

"Not Singer sewed."
Here's a book parents and children will enjoy — together and separately. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MANNERS CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 24, 1936

"Manners books are perennials — hardy ones at that — and this makes first steps in etiquette easy and fun."
This is his best, both in idea and execution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHO CARES? I DO by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 7, 1971

"There's no positive reinforcement in the pictures or the lecture, only a tired watchbird admonishing litterbugs."
Two stick figures state the case, "You Know What? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

I HATE YOU I HATE YOU by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 24, 1968

"Arabs and Jews ('Shalom-Salaam'); whites and blacks; hippies and parents, etc. The conclusion—mushroom cloud with a more auspicious alternative."
A cartoon morality by the Ferdinand-Watchbird seer, in which the "I Hate You's" of two mites pulling at a boy extend to other differentials all over the world—racial, political, domestic. Read full book review >