Search Results: "Munro Leaf"


BOOK REVIEW

READING CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 23, 1953

"All told in direct relationship to its young audience- from pre-readers who will get the idea from listening to it, to kids in the thrown of rejecting their books for funnies and TV- a perfect and humorous antidote to the many modern factors that undermine a true literacy."
Inimitably, Leaf conveys the wonder of the world of books in a way you fervently hope will captivate just one, or ten, a thousand, a million children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 11, 1936

"The most original and amusing thing Leaf has done."
This has an irresistible appeal to the sense of the ridiculous. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 27, 1950

"Just enough detail for a young child to take — with gay little scribblings to make history really fun."
From ancient Egypt to the United Nations in a skip and a jump (with side hops in English and United States history). Mr. Leaf's whimsical style and stick-figure illustrations are justly popular, so expect a large market for this one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE PROMISES TO YOU by Munro Leaf
Released: Feb. 27, 1957

"Fine for that first course in civics, Firmly side sewn."
The basic premises of the United Nations, a body whose tasks are to prevent wars, see that all people get fair treatment and to find ways for people to live better — are given pat and plain treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: March 2, 1939

"Nonsense text and pictures — but the idea gets across."
Munro Leaf can wrap his pills in the best sugar coating of any juvenile writer today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1935

"But, I realize, there are many who disagree, so look it over. It is a simple, logical picture story book outlining the dreadful fate of a lad who wouldn't go to school. Humorous (?) drawings in color by the author on every page."
Am I out of line when I acknowledge to a psychological barrier toward this book — I don't like the illustrations, I don't like this particular sort of sugar-coated moralizing, unless it is done by Hilaire Belloc. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUNRO LEAF'S FUN BOOK by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1941

"Nursery guides to a good life' — already soundly established as favorites among the small fry and big."
Omnibus volume, containing the big three,- Manners Can Be Fun, Grammer Can Be Fun, Safety Can Be Fun. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JOHN HENRY DAVIS by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 9, 1940

"The moral of the story is this:-'Being tough is only another way of being awfully dumb and cheating yourself out of a lot of fun.'"
I suppose there is no use pointing out the fact that this isn't tops for Munro Leaf, that it is a poor title and a bad format, and a very obviously moral tale about a boy that was just too good and a boy that was just too bad. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WISHING POOL by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 28, 1960

"And since Munro Leaf, author of the Can Be Fun series, is the necromancer, the adventures unfold in a rhythmic prose which is simple and pleasurable to read."
Three, children make wishes: One wishes to be a knight, one a cowboy, and the third, a pilot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EL CUENTO DE FERDINANDO by Munro Leaf
Released: March 1, 1962

"But those brave and humble enough to sneak it off the shelves will find it considerably more rewarding than the drab little stories that appear in so many textbooks."
The popularity of Ferdinand the bull has long been established. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WEE GILLIS by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 30, 1938

"So when the chance came, he proved himself as a topnotch bagpiper and acceptable to both sides."
Wee Gillis' father's people were Highlanders; his mother's people were Lowlanders, and he was faced with the problem of which he should be. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOODLE by Ludwig Bemelmans
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 29, 1937

"Grand nonsense and enchanting pictures, by the author-artist of Hansi."
Not so frankly adult as the beloved Ferdinand, but adults will also chortle over the strange search pursued by Noodle, the dachshund, who bemoans the inadequacy of his shape when it comes to digging bones, and tries to decide what shape he prefers when the dog fairy gives him a chance to get his wish. Read full book review >