Search Results: "Munro Leaf"


BOOK REVIEW

SAM AND THE SUPERDROOP by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1948

"Not Singer sewed."
Here's a book parents and children will enjoy — together and separately. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 27, 1950

"Just enough detail for a young child to take — with gay little scribblings to make history really fun."
From ancient Egypt to the United Nations in a skip and a jump (with side hops in English and United States history). Mr. Leaf's whimsical style and stick-figure illustrations are justly popular, so expect a large market for this one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SCIENCE CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 24, 1958

"Add to that an appetite for Leaf's bold and entertaining approach and you have it,- a real help, both in presentation and in the encouragement of further reading."
It was inevitable that science would join arithmetic, manners and the rest, and prove to be fun when presented by the prolific and inspired Munro Leaf. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEALTH CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 15, 1943

"Food, exercise, cleanliness, clothing, rest and sleep — handled in the same vein as Manners Can Be Fun, etc. Munro Leaf has a facility in the directions of moral tales in humorous vein."
The same public that welcomed its predecessors will welcome this new Fun book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: March 2, 1939

"Nonsense text and pictures — but the idea gets across."
Munro Leaf can wrap his pills in the best sugar coating of any juvenile writer today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 2, 1938

"Pen and ink decorations."
Highlighting in an informally conversational way the approach to getting a job, jobs classified and ways of living in New York. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WISHING POOL by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 28, 1960

"And since Munro Leaf, author of the Can Be Fun series, is the necromancer, the adventures unfold in a rhythmic prose which is simple and pleasurable to read."
Three, children make wishes: One wishes to be a knight, one a cowboy, and the third, a pilot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1935

"But, I realize, there are many who disagree, so look it over. It is a simple, logical picture story book outlining the dreadful fate of a lad who wouldn't go to school. Humorous (?) drawings in color by the author on every page."
Am I out of line when I acknowledge to a psychological barrier toward this book — I don't like the illustrations, I don't like this particular sort of sugar-coated moralizing, unless it is done by Hilaire Belloc. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORE WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: March 14, 1940

"This disposes of the nailbiter, the bully, the tattletale, the scary, the wont wash, the butter-in, the squawker, the smasher and so on."
The watchbirds have succeeded the goops with todays children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FAIR PLAY by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 7, 1939

"New characters — a Justme, a Greedy, a Bully and a Lazy — are priceless."
Another honey by the canny creator of The Watchbirds. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NOODLE by Ludwig Bemelmans
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 29, 1937

"Grand nonsense and enchanting pictures, by the author-artist of Hansi."
Not so frankly adult as the beloved Ferdinand, but adults will also chortle over the strange search pursued by Noodle, the dachshund, who bemoans the inadequacy of his shape when it comes to digging bones, and tries to decide what shape he prefers when the dog fairy gives him a chance to get his wish. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

READING CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 23, 1953

"All told in direct relationship to its young audience- from pre-readers who will get the idea from listening to it, to kids in the thrown of rejecting their books for funnies and TV- a perfect and humorous antidote to the many modern factors that undermine a true literacy."
Inimitably, Leaf conveys the wonder of the world of books in a way you fervently hope will captivate just one, or ten, a thousand, a million children. Read full book review >