Search Results: "Munro Leaf"


BOOK REVIEW

SAFETY CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 15, 1938

"Munor Leaf has a gift for this (and other) things."
Companion volume to Manners Can Be Fun, etc., and the best yet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MANNERS CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 24, 1936

"Manners books are perennials — hardy ones at that — and this makes first steps in etiquette easy and fun."
This is his best, both in idea and execution. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THREE PROMISES TO YOU by Munro Leaf
Released: Feb. 27, 1957

"Fine for that first course in civics, Firmly side sewn."
The basic premises of the United Nations, a body whose tasks are to prevent wars, see that all people get fair treatment and to find ways for people to live better — are given pat and plain treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HISTORY CAN BE FUN by Munro Leaf
Released: Sept. 27, 1950

"Just enough detail for a young child to take — with gay little scribblings to make history really fun."
From ancient Egypt to the United Nations in a skip and a jump (with side hops in English and United States history). Mr. Leaf's whimsical style and stick-figure illustrations are justly popular, so expect a large market for this one. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

METRIC CAN BE FUN! by Munro Leaf
Released: May 12, 1976

"Usable, but it can't measure up to the Branley."
Though Leaf's stick figures might help demystify the subject, they don't (despite his title) make it look as much like fun as Lustig's cartoons did in Branley's similarly simple but stronger Measure with Metric last year. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SAM AND THE SUPERDROOP by Munro Leaf
Released: Oct. 1, 1948

"Not Singer sewed."
Here's a book parents and children will enjoy — together and separately. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLY AWAY, WATCHBIRD! by Munro Leaf
Released: Feb. 21, 1941

"It might be called today's equivalent of the Goops of a generation or two age. A picture book of behavior. This volume includes the Know It All, the Pouter, Messy, Snooty, the Borrower, etc. etc."
Third and — in book form — last Watchbird book, though the series goes on and n in the Ladies' Home Journal. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: March 2, 1939

"Nonsense text and pictures — but the idea gets across."
Munro Leaf can wrap his pills in the best sugar coating of any juvenile writer today. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLOCK OF WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: June 15, 1946

"For the watchbirds are guardians of morals and manners, done in such humorous mood that children get fun out of them, while parents reap benefit."
The Watchbirds need no introduction — this is an omnibus volume, containing a good selection of the favorites,- the thumb sucker, the nail biter, et. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MORE WATCHBIRDS by Munro Leaf
Released: March 14, 1940

"This disposes of the nailbiter, the bully, the tattletale, the scary, the wont wash, the butter-in, the squawker, the smasher and so on."
The watchbirds have succeeded the goops with todays children. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1948

"Eye-catching, and merchandise-worthy in the big, bright illustrations of a darling boy and a cat, and with pleasant, alternating black and whites."
The "buck up, it's all nonsense, old man" attitude of Mr. Leaf has proven reassuring to the parents of children, and here, in lavish illustrations by Frances Tipton Hunter, and a healthy and sensible text, the long campaign continues for a healthy mind in a healthy body. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: June 15, 1942

"In his usual technique he shows what those up to eleven can do to help Uncle Sam — by keeping healthy, taking care of things, buying stamps, fixing up a shelter room, first aid, knowing the neighborhood, caring for gardens, destroying ragweed and caterpillar nests, collecting scrap, being good neighbors, and so forth."
This will help many families and teachers round up all the extra energy and cheer which we should get from our young in times like these. Read full book review >