Search Results: "Nancy White Carlstrom"


BOOK REVIEW

Released: Sept. 1, 1999

"It's a dream Halloween, indeed. (Picture book. 3-6)"
In a bouncing rhyme, Jesse Bear (Let's Count It Out, Jesse Bear, 1996, etc.) celebrates Halloween. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

IT’S YOUR FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL, ANNIE CLAIRE by Nancy White Carlstrom
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2009

"It's very sweet, not very original and certain to find an audience. (Picture book. 3-6)"
With a cadence reminiscent of her Jesse Bear books, Carlstrom introduces Annie Claire and her mother, who engage in a soothing duet as the pup prepares for her first day of school. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FISH AND FLAMINGO by Nancy White Carlstrom
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1993

"A bit earnest, but truly handsome: Desimini at her best. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A carefully constructed story about a singular friendship. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SWIM THE SILVER SEA, JOSHIE OTTER by Nancy White Carlstrom
ANIMALS
Released: April 21, 1993

"Carlstrom includes a melodious tune for her three-stanza song. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Mama Otter won't play, so Joshie sets out on his own; but the other arctic animals are too drowsy to play (like the seal pups) or too busy (like the puffins). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BEFORE YOU WERE BORN by Nancy White Carlstrom
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2001

"A beautiful portrayal of the transformation of a couple into a family. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A luminescent tale extolling the miraculous changes wrought by an infant's arrival. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GUESS WHO'S COMING, JESSE BEAR by Nancy White Carlstrom
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 1998

"Although this book is not as edgy and gleeful as Kevin Henkes's A Weekend with Wendell (1986), Carlstrom has developed a winning formula for painlessly introducing young preschoolers to basic skills and information. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Writing in simple, almost conversational verse and varying the meter to avoid singsong, Carlstrom brings her irrepressible young bear back for a seventh appearance, this one built around the days of the week. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LET'S COUNT IT OUT, JESSE BEAR by Nancy White Carlstrom
ANIMALS
Released: Aug. 1, 1996

"Degen's now-familiar watercolors are as snug as ever. (Picture book. 2-6)"
Carlstrom and Degen team up for their sixth entry in a beloved series. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SNOW SPEAKS by Nancy White Carlstrom
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"A lovely evocation, nicely concluded with a cozy Christmas by the fire—and angels, in snow and sky. (Picture book. 4-8)"
An Alaskan author describes the experience of cold weather and snow with poetic grace and the conviction of one who knows the ``thin, brittle air'' that makes ``nostrils stick together'' and children who must stay ``buttoned, hooded, mittened, zipped'' while shaking snow from the mail. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 1, 2009

"Cowdrey's realistic paintings capture the intriguing birds and beasts of the area, from herons and eagles to harbor seals and orca whales, with a dandy orca breaching on the front cover. (Picture book/religion. 4-7)"
Carlstrom, author of the Jesse Bear series, offers a poetic look at the connection between God and nature, basing her free-verse text on a well-known Bible verse ("This is the day the Lord has made"). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MAMA, WILL IT SNOW TONIGHT?  by Nancy White Carlstrom
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2009

"Highly additional. (Picture book. 2-5)"
Three children—a fox, a rabbit and a human girl—each ask their respective Mamas the title question. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: May 18, 1998

"Most poems are presented in double-page spreads with Kuroi's haunting paintings; they occasionally become sentimentally soft and fuzzy, but more often lyrically conjure a sunny Alaskan landscape. (Picture book. 4-8)"
This collection of poems celebrates Alaska's spring and summer seasons, when daylight lasts 24 hours, and when the usually white landscape is transformed into an abundance of flora. Read full book review >