Search Results: "Natalie Babbitt"


BOOK REVIEW

TUCK EVERLASTING by Natalie Babbitt
Released: Nov. 1, 1975

"However the compelling fitness of theme and event and the apt but unexpected imagery (the opening sentences compare the first week in August when this takes place to 'the highest seat of a Ferris wheel when it pauses in its turning') help to justify the extravagant early assertion that had the secret about to be revealed been known at the time of the action, the very earth 'would have trembled on its axis like a beetle on a pin.'"
At a time when death has become an acceptable, even voguish subject in children's fiction, Natalie Babbitt comes through with a stylistic gem about living forever. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL'S STORYBOOK by Natalie Babbitt
Released: June 26, 1974

"Natalie Babbitt's traditional themes abound in elegant twists, and she polishes even the straightest to a pleasing, most un-Angelic perfection."
Taking her cue from the Robert Southey quote with which she introduces her ten stories, Natalie Babbitt eschews fire and brimstone and dramatic villainy to portray a petty, proprietary sort of devil, often conniving but frequently outsmarted (even a goat named Walpurgis almost gets the best of him), with a very middle class concern for his image. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PHOEBE'S REVOLT by Natalie Babbitt
Released: June 15, 1968

"Girls who've balked at bows will sympathize; parents who spot the Gibson girl-gaslight details will have the first and last laugh."
A rhymed revolt by eight-year-old Phoebe Euphemia Brandon Brown who "said she had just one request:/ To dress the way her father dressed." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DICK FOOTE AND THE SHARK by Natalie Babbitt
Released: June 15, 1967

"This won't draw as a picture book (the flat black-and-white is relieved only by the gray-green Sea) but it could be good fun read to a group."
Dick Foote is a sea-fearing poet, his father a sea-faring Philistine. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELSIE TIMES EIGHT by Natalie Babbitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Still, the slyness with which Babbitt captures the Elsies' many moods compensates, and moreover, the concept of a suddenly multiplied self, with its many advantages and disadvantages, is sure to appeal to youngsters. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fairy godmother who is slightly hard of hearing wreaks arithmetic havoc in this original fairy tale from Babbitt (Ouch!, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BUB by Natalie Babbitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 14, 1994

"Not to mention the dog,' says Babbitt in dedicating the book to her human models, and she doesn't; all the same, it's a delight and steals the show, as she doubtless intended. (Picture book. 4-8)"
The King and Queen are at odds: he says "too many toys" will make the Prince "soft and silly"; she says the many lessons with the King will leave him "dry and dusty." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL'S OTHER STORYBOOK by Natalie Babbitt
Released: June 15, 1987

"Begging to be quoted, to be read aloud, to be told, these deceptively direct, wise tales should delight readers and listeners alike—devil stories are always among the most popular, and these are winners."

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 1, 1977

"Still, as Babbit projects it, Gram's devotion—whether steadfast or obsessive—has its fascination."
An atmospheric, romantic tale: of the sea, which "will take what it wants and keep what it has taken"; of a captain's widow who (truly forsaking all others) has been waiting 30 years for a sign from her drowned husband; of the old woman's son who fled in his youth from the treacherous sea—and perhaps from his mother's indifference; and of the granddaughter, also named Geneva, who goes to help when Gram breaks her ankle and who thus becomes involved in her desperate nightly search along the shore. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HERBERT ROWBARGE by Natalie Babbitt
Released: Nov. 15, 1982

"It's an expertly turned artifact of a story, which is not to deny its human sympathy and penetrating edge."
Why is successful Herbert Rowbarge so cold of heart, so lacking in the delight or merriment one would expect of someone so devoted to his popular amusement park and its old-fashioned merry-go-round? Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

KNEEKNOCK RISE by Natalie Babbitt
Released: May 29, 1970

Natalie Babbitt's prose is as clean as her pen line, yet unexpectable: the Mammoth Mountains "were the only point of interest in a countryside that neither rolled nor dipped but lay as flat as if it had been knocked unconscious." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SOMETHING by Natalie Babbitt
Released: Oct. 19, 1970

"And as approached through gray endpaper forest underscored with mysterious footprints, past the title page Milo clutching a candle in the dark, it's instantaneous combustion."
The Something Milo is afraid of is nothing his mother imagines — "She felt very bad about not being able to help him" — and after he shapes it from the clay she gives him to console herself, nothing she recognizes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GOODY HALL by Natalie Babbitt
Released: April 15, 1971

"Another Delicious blend of style, wit and adventure."
A distinguished children's author has concocted a juvenile Gothic that is less a take-off than an affectionate dalliance with the convention. Read full book review >