Search Results: "Natalie Dias Lorenzi"


BOOK REVIEW

FLYING THE DRAGON by Natalie Dias Lorenzi
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2012

"A quiet, beautifully moving portrayal of a multicultural family. (Fiction. 9-12)"
When her cousin unexpectedly moves from Japan to Virginia, a Japanese-American girl finds their cultural differences embarrassing until kite fighting unites them. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A LONG PITCH HOME by Natalie Dias Lorenzi
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 6, 2016

"A warm, sensitive, realistic portrait of a Muslim boy adjusting to contemporary America. (Fiction. 9-12)"
When his family moves from Pakistan to America, a Muslim boy who loves cricket faces a year of adjustment and life without his father. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MONSTER, BE GOOD! by Natalie Marshall
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 14, 2013

"'If a monster is tired and grumpy, send it to bed and say, ‘GO TO SLEEP!' ' Like that would work. (Picture book. 3-5)"
A blatantly psychotherapeutic variation on Where the Wild Things Are and like empowerment fare.Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BROWN RABBIT IN THE CITY by Natalie Russell
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2010

"Her strength remains her mix of warmly colored drawings and prints that seem lifted right out of a street scene in the West Village and strike the perfect balance between hip and cozy. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Following up on Moon Rabbit (2009), Russell brings the same charm to this sequel. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ELSIE TIMES EIGHT by Natalie Babbitt
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Still, the slyness with which Babbitt captures the Elsies' many moods compensates, and moreover, the concept of a suddenly multiplied self, with its many advantages and disadvantages, is sure to appeal to youngsters. (Picture book. 4-8)"
A fairy godmother who is slightly hard of hearing wreaks arithmetic havoc in this original fairy tale from Babbitt (Ouch!, 1998, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FIVE LITTLE DUCKS by Natalie Marshall
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 31, 2017

"An energetic take on a very familiar tune. (Board book. 1-2)"
The simple rhyme is presented in a tabbed board book. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ERROR OF JUDGMENT by Dexter Dias
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 14, 1996

"An even more feverish follow-up to Dias's memorably unpleasant debut (False Witness, 1995), with a particularly nasty series of surprises that don't get sprung till you're convinced you already know the absolute worst about everybody involved."
How's this for an impossible case: Barrister Nick Downes has been assigned the defense of the nameless amnesiac (he turns out to be poet and painter Will Turner) who was caught in a Vice sweep of a Queensway brothel shortly after he told the lady-in- charge that he'd buried a body in a chalk pit in Kent. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SECRET TREE by Natalie Standiford
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2012

"The neat ending gratifies, with many of the issues having been resolved by the resourceful preteens themselves. (Mystery. 9-12)"
Middle-school dynamics, pesky sibling relations, a rumored haunted house, some truly heart-wrenching situations and a mystery all combine to make this coming-of-age novel an engrossing read. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TWILIGHT IN GRACE FALLS by Natalie Honeycutt
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 1, 1997

A fully realized world is created by Honeycutt (Whistle Home, 1993, etc.) in this well-written story of a mill town's economic demise. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DEVIL'S OTHER STORYBOOK by Natalie Babbitt
Released: June 15, 1987

"Begging to be quoted, to be read aloud, to be told, these deceptively direct, wise tales should delight readers and listeners alike—devil stories are always among the most popular, and these are winners."

BOOK REVIEW

SIGNS OF LIFE by Natalie Taylor
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 15, 2011

"Women's book groups take note: For a lively discussion, compare with Joan Didion's The Year of Magical Thinking (2005)."
Emotional memoir of a young life turned upside down by sudden death and then slowly put back right. Read full book review >