Search Results: "Natasha Wing"


BOOK REVIEW

GO TO BED, MONSTER! by Natasha Wing
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 1, 2007

"Knowing toddlers will eagerly reach for their own box of crayons. (Picture book. 2-4)"
Lucy, unable or unwilling to go to sleep, takes out crayons and paper and begins to draw. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

AN EYE FOR COLOR by Natasha Wing
BIOGRAPHY
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

Wing, the author of mass audience favorites (The Night Before the Tooth Fairy, 2003, etc.), takes an aesthetic leap forward in this sophisticated and engaging account of an artist and color theorist whose name is unknown to most young people. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 7, 2017

"Grand, in several ways. (author's & illustrator's notes, sources) (Informational picture book. 7-10)"
An account of the former first lady's impassioned campaign to save one of New York's iconic buildings. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HIPPITY HOP, FROG ON TOP by Natasha Wing
ANIMALS
Released: May 16, 1994

"An additional purchase with possible use for new readers. (Picture book. 3-7)"
When one bullfrog wonders what's on the other side of a wall, nine more frogs happen by and, one by one, climb a mounting tower of frogs hoping to peer over. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BAGEL IN LOVE by Natasha Wing
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 2, 2018

"In contrast to the carbs and desserts pictured, though sweet, this is unlikely to stick with readers. (Picture book. 5-8)"
A romance for carb (and pun!) lovers who dance to their own drummers and don't give up on their dreams. Read full book review >

BLOG POST

THE COMFORT OF HARLEM
by Leila Roy

“Thanks!” Jin said. As she ran off in the opposite direction toward school, she thought about that word: community. Harlem was a diverse place full of all sorts of people, but they all had one thing in common. They cared about the neighborhood. It really was a special place, and if Miss Hardwick and Halmoni were any indication, Councilman ...
Read the full post >

BOOK REVIEW

ANGIE, I SAYS by Avra Wing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 9, 1991

"Wing's strength is her observation of the tooth-and-claw infighting of family life; clearly she has talent, but it badly needs room to breathe."
Some first novels are so indebted to their influences that they cannot help but read like tributes to the Master, and here's a case in point: this first-person narrative about a mother-to-be dealing with an unexpected pregnancy is school of J.D. Salinger, all the way. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL BETTER NOW by Emily Wing Smith
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 8, 2016

"Bland, despite the dramatic medical hook. (Memoir. 14 & up)"
A married woman looks back on her childhood of disability and awkwardness. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SO VAST THE PRISON by Assia Djebar
Released: Nov. 1, 1999

"A moving if schematic celebration of female empowerment and endurance."
So Vast The Prison ($24.95; Nov.; 320 pp.;1-58322-009-7): An affecting tale from a successful Algerian-born novelist, educator, and filmmaker in which an Arabic woman's escape—from both a brutal husband and the traditional domestic role assigned her by the culture—leads to her liberation. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ART OF SOCIAL WAR by Jodi Wing
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 18, 2008

"Wing, no stranger to clunky phrasing (Stacey and her housekeeper sit 'reasonably companionably'), nevertheless has good fun with the wackiness of Hollywood lives."
An effective, if not wholly original first novel, about the shark-infested waters of Hollywood—and that would be mostly lady sharks. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FOR KEEPS by Natasha Friend
Released: April 6, 2010

"Hopeful and endearing. (Fiction. 14 & up)"
Having been deserted by her father before she was born, Josie fears abandonment and heartbreak. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PERFECT by Natasha Friend
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Clearly and simply written with a nice balance of humor and drama, with insight into the mind of 13-year-olds and how families suffer from trauma, this story can speak to girls coping with their own transitions into adolescence. (Fiction. 10-16)"
Thirteen-year-old Isabelle has a gaping hole in her life: her father died several years ago, and she has never expressed her emotions about the tragedy. Read full book review >