Search Results: "Nate Evans"


BOOK REVIEW

MEET THE BEAST by Nate Evans
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2010

"Good for a few goofy laughs. (Fiction. 6-9)"
Nine-year-old Zeke's father sends a care package to Zeke and his younger sister Hannah from an aircraft carrier in the Bermuda Triangle. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

COOKIESAURUS REX by Amy Fellner Dominy
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 26, 2017

"Have cookie dough and frosting ready, as kids are sure to want to try their own hands at decorating after a few laugh-filled rereads. (Picture book. 3-7)"
A dinosaur-shaped cookie takes matters—and frosting—into his own doughy hands. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Pure pleasure for children addicted to dinos, the delights of big trucks and decoding visual jumbles. (Picture book. 5-7)"
A teeming dino crew in hard hats and safety vests create organized if frenetic chaos on a mucky construction site in this alpha-romp. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG BOOK BONANZA by Laura Numeroff
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2010

"Munsinger's watercolors depict the characters with maximum cuteness; Numeroff and co-author Evan's story is similarly warm and simple—if also unabashedly didactic. (Picture book. 3-6)"
No matter what your passion, there's a book written just for you. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TYRANNOSAURUS RALPH by Nate Evans
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 24, 2017

"Readers in search of unalloyed wish fulfillment thickly layered with melodramatic posturing and gore-free, comics-style violence need look no further. (Graphic fantasy/science fiction. 10-12)"
A bullying victim saves Earth after his brain is transferred into the body of a T. Rex. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG DANCE by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2008

"This timely tale of forging connections despite seemingly insurmountable differences provides a light-hearted look at the power of cooperative action. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Four disparate students plus one dance recital add up to a bundle of trouble in this collaborative effort from Evans and Numeroff. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHERMAN CRUNCHLEY by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: Sept. 1, 2003

"Such a little word to create such anxiety, though the authors' point will not be lost on young readers: if you say no, the house will not fall down and family and friends will not flee; this time, the negative has positive potential. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Sherman learns how to be his own dog in a tale that revolves around the ability—or, in Sherman's case, inability—to say no. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JELLYBEANS AND THE BIG CAMP KICKOFF by Laura Numeroff
ANIMALS
Released: March 1, 2011

"Munsinger's watercolor illustrations are bright and suggest vigor and happiness, like the Jellybeans themselves. (Picture book. 3-6)"
Those colorful Jellybeans bring their pep and playfulness to the great outdoors (The Jellybeans and the Big Book Bonanza, 2010, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JELLYBEANS LOVE TO READ by Laura Numeroff
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 11, 2014

"Stick with the original picture book for a simple treatise on the power of literature. (Board book. 3-5)"
A gang of four friends, each a different animal, finds books to enjoy at their local library. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 17, 2017

"In the main, Blakeslee's well-rendered story will be familiar to anyone who has followed the Yellowstone wolves, but those who have not will find this a solid overview of recent events—evenhanded but clearly and rightly on the side of the wolves."
On-the-ground reporting on the fate of Canis lupus as a creature once nearly extirpated struggles to regain a home in the Rockies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 27, 2012

"Some of the sections of the book are best understood by readers with mathematical reasoning skills, but the author is mostly accessible and enlightening."
An anointed wunderkind explains his own success as a prognosticator and explains why so many self-anointed "experts" are often wrong about winners in politics, sports and other realms. Read full book review >