Search Results: "Neal Hirschfeld"


BOOK REVIEW

HIRSCHFELD by Ellen Stern
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 10, 2017

"As the first substantive biography of Hirschfeld, this will be welcomed by art and Broadway lovers alike."
An in-depth biography of America's "line king" caricaturist. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 7, 2010

"Merely serviceable, offering few surprises—much less vigorously written than Michael Codella and Bruce Bennett's Alphaville (2010), which covers some of the same ground."
A retired undercover agent's story. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE HIRSCHFELD CENTURY by Al Hirschfeld
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2015

"An intelligent, carefully representative look at Hirschfeld's work that ably shows why the artist deserves to be remembered today."
A richly illustrated study of the artist who richly illustrated publications, marquees, and other venues for eight decades. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREEZE DRY by Corson Hirschfeld
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"Nonstop fun that tosses Damon Runyonesque characters into Three Stooges situations with the slapstick insanity that characterized Too High (2001)."
Body. And soul. Held together by laughter. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TOO HIGH by Corson Hirschfeld
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 2001

"Hirschfield (Aloha, Mr. Lucky, 2000) is a very funny writer with a well-developed sadistic streak, unlimited imagination when it comes to sexcapades, and the ability to relate historical events in full-farce regalia."
Back in Honolulu, where he was known around the university as the Sex Doctor for his scholarly dissertations on such matters as Fijian yam dildos, aging archeologist Digger Fitz had little preparation for what awaited him in the town of Golden Leaf, in the hills of east Kentucky: his archaeologist cousin's dead carcass, lips sewn closed with a fishing hook and lead lures plumping out his jowls. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"A thoughtful and well-documented work that does not diminish Washington's greatness, but shows the iconic Gilbert Stuart figure at his most morally vulnerable. (20 illustrations)"
Recently several writers (e.g., Conor Cruise O'Brien in The Long Affair) have critically examined the racial hypocrisy of Thomas Jefferson, who preached equality but practiced slavery. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TREE by Neal Layton
by Neal Layton, illustrated by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A feather-light tribute to finding common ground—or make that common air space. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A tree in a deep rural clearing proves to be a small village in jeopardy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO WILD WITH... DESIGNS by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Overall, this colorful concept connects the right dots for a toddler audience. (Board book. 1-3)"
Single-word labels highlight a creative range of designs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAMMOTH ACADEMY by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"The decision by Oscar's new friend Fox to go unwashed as long as possible leads to all sorts of stinky humor that fits right in to this second-tier series opener. (Fantasy. 8-10)"
Scribbly illustrations dominating nearly every spread, Layton's latest plunks fledgling readers down amidst a student body of typical types who—atypically—happen to be mammoths, saber toothed tigers, ground sloths, cave bears and other early mammals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UNBOUND by Neal Shusterman
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Dec. 15, 2015

"A competently produced set of stories that will send fans over the moon and swiftly intrigue newcomers. (Dystopia. 12-16)"
The Unwind world is thoroughly explored in this companion piece. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SEVENEVES by Neal Stephenson
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: May 19, 2015

"Meanwhile, all those exploding planetoids make a good argument for more STEM funding. Wise, witty, utterly well-crafted science fiction."
No slim fables or nerdy novellas for Stephenson (Anathem, 2008, etc.): his visions are epic, and he requires whole worlds—and, in this case, solar systems—to accommodate them.Read full book review >