Search Results: "Neal Layton"


BOOK REVIEW

THE TREE by Neal Layton
by Neal Layton, illustrated by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Feb. 7, 2017

"A feather-light tribute to finding common ground—or make that common air space. (Picture book. 2-5)"
A tree in a deep rural clearing proves to be a small village in jeopardy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

GO WILD WITH... DESIGNS by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 1, 2012

"Overall, this colorful concept connects the right dots for a toddler audience. (Board book. 1-3)"
Single-word labels highlight a creative range of designs. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAMMOTH ACADEMY by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2008

"The decision by Oscar's new friend Fox to go unwashed as long as possible leads to all sorts of stinky humor that fits right in to this second-tier series opener. (Fantasy. 8-10)"
Scribbly illustrations dominating nearly every spread, Layton's latest plunks fledgling readers down amidst a student body of typical types who—atypically—happen to be mammoths, saber toothed tigers, ground sloths, cave bears and other early mammals. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SMILE IF YOU'RE HUMAN by Neal Layton
Released: March 1, 1999

"The goofy illustrations deploy a childlike sense of fun; the aliens are pleasant creatures with round patchwork bodies and eyes on stalks, and the gregarious zoo animals will ring true for the animal cracker set. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Layton's zany alien family comes to Earth in search of humans, but with only guidebook descriptions of what people look like, it's easy to make mistakes—especially when their flying saucer lands at the zoo! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BARTHOLOMEW AND THE BUG by Neal Layton
ADVENTURE
Released: July 15, 2006

"A lighthearted take on mortality, as well as the old truth that travel is a broadening experience. (Picture book. 6-8)"
First U.S. edition of a UK prizewinner, this brief tale sends a kindhearted bear and a short-lived crane flying off to the Big City. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOT HOT HOT by Neal Layton
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2004

"Shocking. (Picture book. 6-8)"
Two woolly mammoths come up with a palliative for summer's heat in this high-energy import. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Layton's bright, eclectic illustration style should be reprised soon, while he is developing better storytelling ideas. (Picture book. 5-8)"
If ever there was a case to argue for "living in the moment"—this is it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANIMALS
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Something to crow about. (index, glossary) (Nonfiction. 8-12)"
Having explored poop and parasites, survival techniques and size, Davies and Layton turn to animal communication, describing how animals send and receive messages by sound, sight, smell and touch, for a variety of purposes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MUCKY DUCK by Sally Grindley
ANIMALS
Released: June 1, 2003

"Bath-phobic youngsters will identify with Ducky, and perhaps be persuaded by Grindley's good-natured humor to clean up their act. (Picture book. 3-6)"
A duck who likes to get dirty stars in Grindley's latest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THAT RABBIT BELONGS TO EMILY BROWN by Cressida Cowell
ANIMALS
Released: April 1, 2007

"This empathetic yet rollicking treatment will ring true with kids, making this a great candidate for family read-alouds. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Emily Brown and her rabbit, Stanley, suffer multiple intrusions into their fantastical adventures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: March 12, 2013

"Easily digestible, if not particularly nutritious. (index, glossary) (Nonfiction. 7-9)"
Davies (Talk, Talk, Squawk!, 2011) rips viciously into another popular topic with this gallery of animals "decked out for killing"—from tiny venomous spiders to big cats for whom humans are just slow-moving "meals-on-legs." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HOWLER by Michael Rosen
by Michael Rosen, illustrated by Neal Layton
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2004

"Layton's quick brushwork and scribbly lines further brighten this lively, equally droll follow-up to Rover (1999). (Picture book. 6-8)"
A dog's-eye view of family changes. Read full book review >