Search Results: "Neil A. Lewis"


BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: March 13, 2013

"Dense for general readers but an excellent scholarly read encompassing new ideas for Lewis devotees or those interested in religious argument."
Christian theologian McGrath (Theology and Ministry/King's College London; Mere Apologetics, 2012, etc.) dissects the life of C.S. Lewis 50 years after the author's death, focusing on how his life was impacted by theology and vice versa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS by A. Barsell Carlyle
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 23, 2009

"An enjoyable beach read for men, but suspense lags until the final pages."
A debut novel of men's fiction/suspense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

A PICTURE BOOK OF LEWIS AND CLARK by David A. Adler
ADVENTURE
Released: March 15, 2003

"By the time it began, it belonged to the United States'), but it does little to bring the fuzzy geography into focus. (Picture book/nonfiction. 4-8)"
Adler (A Picture Book of Harriet Beecher Stowe, p. 378, etc.) marks the 200th anniversary of the Lewis and Clark expedition with this informative biography for young readers. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEIL ARMSTRONG by Jay Barbree
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2014

"A wholly admiring assessment of Armstrong the aviator and Armstrong the man."
A longtime NBC News space correspondent looks back on the aviation career of the first man to set foot on the moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

C.S. LEWIS by Michael White
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"A readable, balanced portrait of a great humanist."
Prolific English biographer White (Leonardo, 2000, etc.) delineates in lively fashion the less than saintly life of the Christian apologist, children's author, Luddite, and fuddy-duddy Oxford don. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: June 15, 1995

"This suspenseful book, based on interviews with key players, including Ames himself, lends powerful ammunition to Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan's argument that the CIA has seen its day and should be abolished. (Author tour)"
An eye-widening look inside one of America's most notorious spy cases. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

LEWIS & CLARK by Nick Bertozzi
FICTION
Released: Feb. 1, 2011

"Slated to be the first in a series on explorers, this expedition ends with high hopes for subsequent volumes. (selected bibliography) (Graphic historical fiction. 12 & up)"
With masterful command, Bertozzi offers an innovative take on Meriwether Lewis and William Clark's epic journey in this oversized graphic offering. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 1, 1993

"Bibliography; index. (Biography. 12+)"
Latimer, a self-taught draftsman, drew up Bell's patent application for the telephone (delivered to the Patent Office only hours before a rival claim) and went on to frame many of Edison's patents, help him improve the light bulb, and supervise the installation of electrical systems in several cities. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Oct. 8, 1997

"A charming if terse summary of the journey; readers wanting a detailed history should look elsewhere. (First printing of 100,000; Literary Guild main selection)"
Duncan's second book on the Lewis and Clark expedition (Out West, 1987) is the companion volume to the newest documentary by Burns, scheduled to air on public television stations in early November. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Nov. 12, 1995

"Cohen sees Dodgson finally as a talented, upright, melancholy figure, but does not fully integrate Carroll into this protean man. (135 illustrations, not seen)"
Cohen, the editor of Carroll's herculean correspondence, succeeds with the man's Victorian character—both the academic and the eccentric elements—but misses the point of Carroll's pointless nonsense. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE LEWIS MAN by Peter May
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 2, 2014

"Despite some well-judged surprises, the mystery isn't all that mysterious. But you'll keep turning the pages anyway—not to learn whodunit, but to find out what's going to happen to the present-day characters so deeply, fatally rooted in the past."
The second installment in May's Lewis trilogy finds Fin Macleod (The Blackhouse, 2011) without a job or wife but with another brooding case set on the outermost island of the Outer Hebrides.Read full book review >