Search Results: "Neil Asher Silberman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"His depiction of the interplay between ancient history and its manipulation by nations, quacks, and petty academics is terrific."
International intrigue, scholarly arrogance, and eccentric personalities populate this examination of what the Dead Sea Scrolls really tell us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Despite the occasional spark of connection, this epigonous work, so admittedly indebted to Scholem, adds little to what can be found more eloquently expressed in the master's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism."
This new book by Silberman (The Hidden Scrolls, 1994) founders on the distinction it fails to keep between history and myth, description and celebration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"An eloquent, well-researched study of Israel's most eloquent researcher. (Photographs)"
Thorough, fascinating life of Yigael Yadin (1917-84), the Israeli soldier-archaeologist who both made and remade history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 2001

"Believers won't much like this new look at the Bible through an archaeological lens, and scholars won't find anything new, but everyone else will find Finkelstein and Silberman amiable guides."
A highly readable introduction to ancient archaeology and what it can teach us about the Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ASHER by Mark Fyfe
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 1997

"Less a novel than an attempt at a mordant, brief glimpse into a sociopath: a debut, filled with indulgences and bravado, that makes an impression despite its weaknesses."
English adolescent anomie, told from a male perspective. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"Stylishly written and rich in memorable detail, this is a rare find that actually offers fresh insight into the overstudied New Testament. (2 maps)"
An eloquent social history of first-century Palestine by Horsley (Religion/Univ. of Massachusetts) and Silberman (The Hidden Scrolls, 1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEIL ARMSTRONG by Jay Barbree
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: July 8, 2014

"A wholly admiring assessment of Armstrong the aviator and Armstrong the man."
A longtime NBC News space correspondent looks back on the aviation career of the first man to set foot on the moon. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

MY NAME IS ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: April 1, 1972

"But Potok, as in The Chosen, is able to sustain a singleminded gloomy intensity and will attract the same audience, assisted by the Literary Guild selection."
This features the agonizing young years of Asher Lev caught between the imperatives of his Hasid family's dynastic destiny and the forbidden visions of the goyische world of art. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GIFT OF ASHER LEV by Chaim  Potok
Released: May 11, 1990

"But, then again, there is that restless, eager journeying in the dark—and then the sudden shimmerings of possibility—in odysseys of the soul that gives Potok's spiritually searching novels their saving strength."
In this sequel to My Name is Asher Lev (1972), the author of The Chosen (1967) and Davita's Harp (1985)—as well as other fictional probes of the rich complexities of Jewish Orthodoxy—brings his protagonist artist back to the Hasidic community in Brooklyn from France. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 9, 2005

"An ambling and chatty road trip journal that becomes a surprisingly meaningful rumination on getting old without fading away."
Vancouver novelist Chong (Baroque-A-Nova, 2002) hits the road with a few buddies to retrace Neil Young's steps to rock stardom. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NEIL FLAMBÉ AND THE BARD'S BANQUET by Kevin Sylvester
CHILDREN'S
Released: Jan. 13, 2015

"The constant suspense, innocent romance, a lovely recipe for scones, and the flamboyant, irrepressible chef will captivate fans of the series and impel new readers to the nearest bookstore or library. (Mystery. 10-14)"
Neil Flambé, 15-year-old culinary genius, contends with Shakespearean lore in this fifth addition to the mystery series that highlights his name (and sensitive nose). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE GREEN AGE OF ASHER WITHEROW by M. Allen Cunningham
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 7, 2004

"Disjointed material and unmatured style make for some rough sledding."
Life and death among Welsh immigrant coalminers in 19th-century California. Read full book review >