Search Results: "Neil Asher Silberman"


BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 19, 1994

"His depiction of the interplay between ancient history and its manipulation by nations, quacks, and petty academics is terrific."
International intrigue, scholarly arrogance, and eccentric personalities populate this examination of what the Dead Sea Scrolls really tell us. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 1, 1998

"Despite the occasional spark of connection, this epigonous work, so admittedly indebted to Scholem, adds little to what can be found more eloquently expressed in the master's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism."
This new book by Silberman (The Hidden Scrolls, 1994) founders on the distinction it fails to keep between history and myth, description and celebration. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Dec. 1, 1993

"An eloquent, well-researched study of Israel's most eloquent researcher. (Photographs)"
Thorough, fascinating life of Yigael Yadin (1917-84), the Israeli soldier-archaeologist who both made and remade history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Jan. 10, 2001

"Believers won't much like this new look at the Bible through an archaeological lens, and scholars won't find anything new, but everyone else will find Finkelstein and Silberman amiable guides."
A highly readable introduction to ancient archaeology and what it can teach us about the Bible. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 13, 1997

"Stylishly written and rich in memorable detail, this is a rare find that actually offers fresh insight into the overstudied New Testament. (2 maps)"
An eloquent social history of first-century Palestine by Horsley (Religion/Univ. of Massachusetts) and Silberman (The Hidden Scrolls, 1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: May 1, 2008

"Not for the faint of heart, the faint of stomach or those put off by relentless descriptions of battle scenes."
French colonialism goes awry in a saga of hope, betrayal, slaughter and cannibalism in 19th-century North Africa. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: March 1, 1999

"Asher's well-written account of this evolution of understanding makes for a useful contribution to the small but growing body of work on Anglo-Native American legal interaction. (2 maps)"
A solid, specialized contribution to American Indian legal history. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT LIGHT by Jay Asher
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Oct. 18, 2016

"Though apparently titled for the line from Romeo and Juliet, this second solo outing for the author of Thirteen Reasons Why is not a love story for the ages. (Fiction. 13-18)"
Love, hope, and forgiveness are under the tree this Christmas. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ALL OF US AND EVERYTHING by Bridget Asher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Nov. 24, 2015

"An entertaining yet astute look at family, self, story, and connections."
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, three generations of Rockwell women sift through their histories—real, imagined, rumored, and written—and discover that, like storms, life is impossible to control. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE PROVENCE CURE FOR THE BROKENHEARTED by Bridget Asher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: March 22, 2011

"Unabashedly romantic and unafraid of melancholy, Asher's book is a real charmer about a Provencal house that casts spells over the lovelorn."
In an affecting story about loss, a young widow goes to Provence to renovate her family's home—and hopefully fix her heart. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHAT A PARTY! by Sandy Asher
ANIMALS
Released: Feb. 1, 2007

"Parents should find the whole scenario entirely familiar. (Picture book. 5-8)"
Young Froggie has such fantastic experiences at Grandpa's birthday party that he doesn't want it to end. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE FESTIVAL OF INSIGNIFICANCE by Milan Kundera
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 23, 2015

"This strangely amusing novella has the power to inspire serious efforts to find significance in the very book in which it is so perversely denied."
Forgotten tyrants and blatant belly buttons have equally playful roles in this deceptively slight, whimsically thoughtful tale of a few men in Paris not doing or saying much. Read full book review >