Search Results: "Nette Hilton"


BOOK REVIEW

THE LONG RED SCARF by Nette Hilton
Released: Nov. 5, 1990

In a cheerful, amusingly repetitive, nicely cadenced voice, an unseen narrator tells how "my grandfather"—admiring fishing crony Jake's cozy neckpiece—tries to get one of his female relatives to knit one for him. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WEB by Nette Hilton
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"The full-page and spot illustrations are squiggly and vibrant and have more energy than the sentimental and slightly simplistic story. (Fiction. 6-10)"
A well-intentioned but preachy chapter book about a girl, her failing great-grandmother and a spider. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WOOLLY JUMPERS by Nette Hilton
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2013

"Readers who might be miffed at the anti-city, anti-computer bias will be much mollified by hearing the animals' conversations, which make it all worthwhile. (Fiction. 8-11)"
Twins Mikey and Jake and their baby sister, Sally, move to the country from the city, with interesting results, in this middle-grade tale touched lightly with fantasy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SIDEWALK HILTON by Bruce Cook
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: May 19, 1994

LA detective Chico Cervantes's fourth case seems to have been written by two ill-matched collaborators. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: May 1, 2012

"The overall picture is not the unrelentingly gruesome story promised but rather a thoughtful series of meditations on living as well as possible under the worst possible conditions."
Collection of short essays about an American's hard time in two of Thailand's most notorious prisons. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PAINTED SKINS by Matt Hilton
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Dec. 1, 2016

"Rated R for sex, violence, sexual violence, and perhaps one too many violent rapists working independently and, indeed, at odds with each other. Now if only Hilton delivered the punch that breaking all those taboos would seem to promise."
The disappearance of a young woman old enough to know better but who probably doesn't leads Portland private eye Tess Grey and Nicolas "Po" Villere, her operative and lover (Blood Tracks, 2015), into a wildly tangled thicket of felonies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WHITE GIRLS by Hilton Als
ESSAYS & ANTHOLOGIES
Released: Nov. 12, 2013

"Als' work is so much more than simply writing about being black or gay or smart. It's about being human."
Meditations, appraisals, fictions and personal inquiries about sex, race, art and more from the longtime New Yorker staff writer and cultural critic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

RETURN TO FINKLETON by K.C. Hilton
Released: April 26, 2011

"Suitable for children 9-11 years old, this continuation of a magical adventure is a pleasure to read."
A father leads his family hiking one evening to see an unforgettable sight: thousands of glowworms lighting up Finkleton Valley. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MAGIC OF FINKLETON by K.C. Hilton
Released: April 26, 2011

"A solid, simple read that encourages altruism while remaining lighthearted."
Hilton tells a creative tale of a magical rural village in England. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: April 2, 1999

"The Cold War was a war, and Kramer is scarred, but few fought it with more honor, consistency, and moral passion."
An honest, unsparing, and often devastating analysis of how the intellectuals of the left—and for much of the last 70 years the term ‘intellectual' was almost synonymous with the left—dealt with the supreme moral conflict of our times, that between communism and democracy. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WOMEN by Hilton Als
NON-FICTION
Released: Nov. 1, 1996

"What makes this debut book so compelling is the author's ability to combine extreme honesty with sharp critical discourse, his willingness to explore the shadows of complex lives, including his own, that challenge clichÇs about race and gender without ever sacrificing intellectual rigor."
Examining the images of ``the Negress'' and the ``good Negro'' as they have shaped the lives of several remarkable men and women, including Fulbright scholar and ``fag hag'' Dorothy Dean, poet Owen Dodson, and the author himself, this extended essay combines riveting subject matter with an original critical approach. Read full book review >