Search Results: "Nicholas Lander"


BOOK REVIEW

THE ART OF THE RESTAURATEUR by Nicholas Lander
NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 17, 2012

"The line-drawn illustrations complement the prose in a book that will help diners appreciate the whole restaurant experience."
An incisively written and elegantly designed volume that presents a corrective, or at least a counterargument, to the ascent of the celebrity chef. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

HEAVEN by Nicholas Allan
ANIMALS
Released: Jan. 31, 1997

"When a stray puppy comes to live with the girl, she tries to give it a little heaven on earth, but readers may already have gone on to the more congenial version of paradise found in Cynthia Rylant's Dog Heaven (1995). (Picture book. 4-6)"
Most books about the death of a pet are solemn and carefully worded, but Allan (Jesus' Christmas Party, 1992, etc.) treats the subject in a decidedly different manner. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

UP THE WALL by Nicholas Heller
ADVENTURE
Released: May 26, 1992

"A novel notion, elaborated with imagination and style. (Picture book. 4-8)"
Everywhere the small narrator goes, someone in his family is busy and asking him to be quiet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

JESUS' CHRISTMAS PARTY by Nicholas Allan
Released: Oct. 1, 1992

"Charming. (Picture book. 3+)"
``There was nothing the innkeeper liked more than a good night's sleep,'' begins this amusing account of the Blessed Event from his point of view. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE TRUE ADVENTURES OF NICOLÒ ZEN by Nicholas Christopher
YOUNG ADULT
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"As Nicolò morphs from street kid to orphanage crasher to Europe's foremost solo clarinetist, abetted by a fascinating pair of magician brothers, engrossed readers should gladly ride the plot's twists and turns. (Fantasy. 12 & up)"
Accomplished poet and novelist Christopher delivers a debut for teens thickly woven with 18th-century Venetian intrigue and metaphysical magic. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FRESHWATER ROAD by Denise Nicholas
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Sept. 1, 2005

"A painful journey over well-trod ground."
One of the civil-rights movement's most iconic projects, Freedom Summer 1964, is revisited in this first novel by an actress who was also a participant. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NON-FICTION
Released: Sept. 1, 2013

"Occasionally scattershot but valuable look at the way California's medical marijuana law and the crackdown against it have affected people of all walks of life."
A portrait of a popular proposition running afoul of federal drug enforcement agencies. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Dec. 1, 2010

"Ostler does not assume specialist knowledge, but he does assume that his readers share his gargantuan and voluptuary appetite for words, languages and history."
A bracing history of lingua francas and their dynamic variation, with a focus on the perfect wave that International English is riding—toward a wipeout, predicts Foundation for Endangered Languages founder Ostler (Ad Infinitum: A Biography of Latin, 2007, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE by Nicholas Coleridge
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Nov. 1, 1997

"Coleridge's simmering insider dish—less a novel than an autobiographical venting of spleen—too rapidly cools to a brittle crust."
Take-no-prisoners whodunit set in the British magazine industry, from CondÇ Nast's London-based managing director. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN OF DARKNESS AND LIGHT by Nicholas Mosley
SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY
Released: July 15, 1997

"Reminiscent of Doris Lessing's The Four-Gated City, and a highly interesting addition to Mosley's somber studies of contemporary moral failure and looming future shock."
A disturbingly prophetic vision of a contaminated near-future from the British writer whose dense and demanding fiction include Accident (1966) and the Whitbread Award-winning Hopeful Monsters (1991). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

Released: Aug. 1, 1983

"Mildly involving, never-disturbing short fiction, then: sentimental, wistfully thoughtful, undistinguished."
Like much of Delbanco's full-length fiction (Stillness, Sherbrookes, etc.), these nine stories are intelligent, readable, well-meaning—yet lacking in depth, drama, or texture. Read full book review >