Search Results: "Nicholas Shakespeare"


BOOK REVIEW

NICHOLAS by René Goscinny
Kirkus Star
by René Goscinny, illustrated by Jean-Jacques Sempé, translated by Anthea Bell
CHILDREN'S
Released: July 1, 2005

"At least one sequel is scheduled. (Fiction. 9-11)"
A favorite in France for decades, these 19 tongue-in-cheek tales of daily life as seen through the eyes of an uncritical young everylad will elicit bursts of laughter from children and adults alike. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICHOLAS by Jeremy Seal
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2005

"Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. Here is evidence in an investigative report on who he was before he became the cult personage in the polar parsonage."
Nicholas, the fourth-century resident of Myra, Anatolia, one of the most popular saints, is the subject of this ornate biographical treatment. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE DANCER UPSTAIRS by Nicholas Shakespeare
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Jan. 1, 1997

"Precisely, beautifully detailed, with a remarkable grasp of tension in a society not the writer's own: a tale both faithful to its time and utterly timeless."
In a sequel of sorts to his award-winning novel The Vision of Elena Silves (1990), Shakespeare again explores an explosive situation in Latin America (inspired by the Shining Path insurrection in Peru), deftly mingling love and suspense in a powerful, persuasive narrative. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SECRETS OF THE SEA by Nicholas Shakespeare
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 24, 2008

"Although oddly paced and occasionally quirky, this is both a skillful, empathetic tale and an affectionate portrait of a place and its community."
Set in Tasmania, an accomplished love story by British author Shakespeare (Snowleg, 2004, etc.). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SNOWLEG by Nicholas Shakespeare
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2004

"Both sentimental and avant-garde, much as with The Dancer Upstairs, the story here beats with so strong a pulse that its portrait of a frozen East Germany will remind readers of the journey anyone devastated by loss and betrayal must make in order to reach the point of risking love again."
Another richly imagined tale of thwarted romance from Shakespeare (The Dancer Upstairs, 1997). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

PRISCILLA by Nicholas Shakespeare
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Jan. 7, 2014

"A somewhat disjointed story that nonetheless successfully recounts how one woman dealt with her dysfunctional life."
Novelist Shakespeare (In Tasmania, 2004, etc.) searches for the realities of his aunt's life before, during and after World War II. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BRUCE CHATWIN by Nicholas Shakespeare
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Feb. 15, 2000

"An unflinching reconstruction of a singular writer's scorching trajectory through life: Speed makes it concise; fate makes it haunting. (Family tree, photos, not seen) (Author tour)"
An ingenious, outsize myth-meets-facts "life and works" of the charismatic global citizen and compulsive tale-teller. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE by Bill Bryson
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Nov. 1, 2007

"Shakespeare redux for the common reader."
A telling glance at one of history's most famously unknowable figures. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE by Michael Rosen
ADVENTURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2001

"Beautiful and engaging. (timeline, bibliography) (Biography. 10+)"
Rosen makes the life and work of Shakespeare vibrant and exciting in this perfectly splendid biography. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE by Harold Bloom
NON-FICTION
Released: Oct. 26, 1998

"Less interesting as a salvo in the ongoing culture wars than as an old-fashioned exercise in narrative criticism for the general reader and, as such, very nearly perfect."
A magisterial survey of the Bard's complete dramatic oeuvre by the always stimulating author of The Western Canon (1994). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SHAKESPEARE by Anthony Burgess
Released: Oct. 14, 1970

With a little highly educated guesswork but no invention, with great humor and infinite admiration, the "nth" attempt to recreate the life and society from which the plays and poems stemmed, as well as to lend substance to the shadow of the man. Read full book review >