Search Results: "Nick E. Tran"


BOOK REVIEW

THE CARTESIAN MACHINE by Nick E. Tran
Released: Aug. 1, 2011

"Conceptually interesting but overly cartoonish and in need of editing."
A sweeping sci-fi, nuclear disaster thriller with religious and metaphysical undertones. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E by Matt Beaumont
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Oct. 1, 2000

"Your career may depend on it."
Subject: Fab debut of former London adman, making a bugger-all brilliant update on the epistolary novel by having it largely in e-mail thrashing about on the office network and focusing on London's Miller Shanks ad agency striving to land the Coke account. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK & JAKE by Tad Richards
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Although occasionally almost too self-consciously witty, this is a rollicking good read."
Goofy, funny and full of literary in-jokes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

...AND NICK by Emily Gore
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 16, 2015

"Charming, encouraging, and delightful. Go, Nick! (Picture book. 3-8)"
In a mouse family of four nearly identical brothers, Nick always seems to be trying to catch up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

STE-E-E-E-EAMBOAT A-COMIN’! by Jill Esbaum
CHILDREN'S
Released: April 8, 2005

"The Story of Captain Blanche Leathers (2000), illus by Holly Meade, though its content is closer to William Anderson's comparatively restrained River Boy (2003), illus by Dan Andreasen. (afterword, map) (Picture book. 7-9)"
Inspired by a passage from Mark Twain's Life on the Mississippi, Esbaum captures the bustle and commotion attending a steam packet's arrival in a small river town: "Rubberneckers, / pounding boots, / whiskered geezers, big galoots. / Wheels a-clatter, / choking cloud, / yapping dog, excited crowd." Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK PLAYS BASEBALL by Rachel Isadora
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"A gentle introduction to the National Pastime. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Nick and his teammates on the Little League Rockets prepare for a big game. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK OF TIME by Anne Lindbergh
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1994

With its earnestly wholesome principles, the progressive little school in Alcott, N.H., could have been designed by Bronson Alcott himself; but despite the idealistic pedantry of its founder/headmaster (who prefers the title ``Fugleman''), what goes on among its eight pupils (who are markedly smarter than their ``mentors'' [teachers]) is farce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NICK ADAMS STORIES by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 1972

"There are eight new stories constituting 40% of the book and extending its interest as unpublished rather than merely republished Hemingway."
A short preface by Philip Young explains the raison d'etre of this presentation of the Nick Adams stories which here are arranged chronologically and therefore provide a continuity — from child to adolescent to soldier to writer — and reveal the character developmentally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SYNDROME E by Franck Thilliez
Released: Aug. 16, 2012

"Having achieved bestseller status in Europe, Thilliez is poised to do the same in the U.S."
In this terrific French thriller, a veteran Paris profiler struggling with paranoid schizophrenia and a lonely female police detective are brought together by a series of gruesome murders that have something to do with an old experimental film containing disturbing subliminal images. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-MERGENCY by Tom Lichtenheld
CHILDREN'S
Released: Nov. 1, 2011

"Definitely not a beginner's ABC book, but the visual and print punnery will have elementary kids (and adults) guessing and laughing. (Alphabet picture book. 7-10)"
Help! The letter E has fallen (down the stairs) and can't get up! Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

E-MAIL by Stephanie D. Fletcher
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: Jan. 30, 1996

"Long, bland stretches alternate with vulgar, hyperexplicit sexual confessions: a cheap, easy, and convincing glimpse of modern American cybersex—for what that may be worth."
Non-initiates to the communications revolution can now enjoy cyber-romance on the printed page—thanks to this epistolary first novel by a North Carolina writer. Read full book review >