Search Results: "Nick Price"


BOOK REVIEW

NICK & JAKE by Tad Richards
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Although occasionally almost too self-consciously witty, this is a rollicking good read."
Goofy, funny and full of literary in-jokes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

...AND NICK by Emily Gore
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 16, 2015

"Charming, encouraging, and delightful. Go, Nick! (Picture book. 3-8)"
In a mouse family of four nearly identical brothers, Nick always seems to be trying to catch up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK PLAYS BASEBALL by Rachel Isadora
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"A gentle introduction to the National Pastime. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Nick and his teammates on the Little League Rockets prepare for a big game. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TUMTUM & NUTMEG by Emily Bearn
ADVENTURE
Released: April 1, 2009

"Sweet but never saccharine—and how often do rescues involve mice on pogo sticks? (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Charmingly old-fashioned but full of vigor, three tales about spry mouse couple Mr. and Mrs. Nutmouse offer humor and adventure. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

VINCENT PRICE by Victoria Price
BIOGRAPHY & MEMOIR
Released: Oct. 1, 1999

"These are the things readers want to know about in detail, not the run-down on the cast of Laura. (32 pages b&w photos)"
Although she gives a thoughtful and detailed recounting of Vincent Price's career, his daughter sticks too closely to the facts to make this biography anything special—a disappointment, considering the potential. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE ROSE COTTAGE TALES by Emily Bearn
ADVENTURE
Released: Oct. 5, 2010

"Nonetheless, if this volume feels a little more slapdash than the first, it still harkens charmingly back to The Wind in the Willows and The Borrowers. (recipes) (Fantasy. 6-9)"
Three rousing adventures sweep up homebody mice Nutmeg and Tumtum in their continuing role as unofficial guardians of human children Arthur and Lucy and amusingly immature military rodent General Marchmouse. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SNAGGLEGROLLOP by Daniel Postgate
ANIMALS
Released: May 1, 2009

"The crazy perspectives and the little white dog that hides in most spreads add a bit of fun to this otherwise also-ran British import. (Picture book. 3-7)"
Sam wants a pet. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK OF TIME by Anne Lindbergh
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1994

With its earnestly wholesome principles, the progressive little school in Alcott, N.H., could have been designed by Bronson Alcott himself; but despite the idealistic pedantry of its founder/headmaster (who prefers the title ``Fugleman''), what goes on among its eight pupils (who are markedly smarter than their ``mentors'' [teachers]) is farce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NICK ADAMS STORIES by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 1972

"There are eight new stories constituting 40% of the book and extending its interest as unpublished rather than merely republished Hemingway."
A short preface by Philip Young explains the raison d'etre of this presentation of the Nick Adams stories which here are arranged chronologically and therefore provide a continuity — from child to adolescent to soldier to writer — and reveal the character developmentally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FICTION
Released: May 23, 2006

"Sensual and full of texture. (Fiction. YA)"
The wattage goes way up as two of the bright lights of contemporary writing for teens come together for an incandescent he said/she said night of storytelling. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK OF TIME by Ted Bell
ADVENTURE
Released: May 13, 2008

"Bell should have left this one in his sea chest. (Fantasy. 11-13)"
The author of several Ian Fleming-style thrillers for adults reworks his lengthy self-published 2000 debut into a windy, labored and even longer doorstopper. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FREEDOM'S PRICE by Michaela MacColl
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 6, 2015

"It's understandable to want to create spunky historical heroines, but some children in the past weren't free to be headstrong—their survival depended on caution. To write fiction otherwise becomes gross revisionism. (author's note, sources, further reading) (Historical fiction. 8-12)"
This entry in MacCall and Nichols' Hidden Histories series takes a fictional look at the Dred Scott decision. Read full book review >