Search Results: "Nick Sunday"


BOOK REVIEW

SUNDAY by Synthia Saint James
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 1996

"Very young members of the picture-book set may want to connect more directly with the people pictured and grow weary of the facelessness, but older children will find the bold use of color and shapes appealing. (Picture book. 5-8)"
The design is the thing in this celebration of the activities of an African-American family, by the illustrator of Karen English's Neeny Coming, Neeny Going (1995). Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

...AND NICK by Emily Gore
CHILDREN'S
Released: June 16, 2015

"Charming, encouraging, and delightful. Go, Nick! (Picture book. 3-8)"
In a mouse family of four nearly identical brothers, Nick always seems to be trying to catch up. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK & JAKE by Tad Richards
Released: Sept. 1, 2012

"Although occasionally almost too self-consciously witty, this is a rollicking good read."
Goofy, funny and full of literary in-jokes. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK PLAYS BASEBALL by Rachel Isadora
CHILDREN'S
Released: March 1, 2001

"A gentle introduction to the National Pastime. (Picture book. 6-9)"
Nick and his teammates on the Little League Rockets prepare for a big game. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 1, 2002

"Layton's bright, eclectic illustration style should be reprised soon, while he is developing better storytelling ideas. (Picture book. 5-8)"
If ever there was a case to argue for "living in the moment"—this is it. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE SUNDAY TERTULIA by Lori marie Carlson
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: June 1, 2000

"Sleep inducing, overall, like windy speechifying after a heavy meal."
An informal gathering (tertulia) once a month brings together a group of women friends who share a meal and conversation. Lots and lots of conversation, it would seem. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

NICK OF TIME by Anne Lindbergh
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 1994

With its earnestly wholesome principles, the progressive little school in Alcott, N.H., could have been designed by Bronson Alcott himself; but despite the idealistic pedantry of its founder/headmaster (who prefers the title ``Fugleman''), what goes on among its eight pupils (who are markedly smarter than their ``mentors'' [teachers]) is farce. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE NICK ADAMS STORIES by Ernest Hemingway
FICTION & LITERATURE
Released: April 17, 1972

"There are eight new stories constituting 40% of the book and extending its interest as unpublished rather than merely republished Hemingway."
A short preface by Philip Young explains the raison d'etre of this presentation of the Nick Adams stories which here are arranged chronologically and therefore provide a continuity — from child to adolescent to soldier to writer — and reveal the character developmentally. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

BIRMINGHAM SUNDAY by Larry Dane Brimner
FICTION
Released: Feb. 20, 2010

"A standout book for its thorough research and comprehensive look at the incident that led to the 1964 passage of civil-rights legislation. (further reading, author's note, source notes, picture credits) (Nonfiction. 10 & up)"
Brimner focuses on the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church and successfully illuminates in chronological order the events, social tensions and political reverberations of that terror-filled time. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

SUNDAY CHUTNEY by Aaron Blabey
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 1, 2009

"Blabey doesn't answer that question, but his clear acrylics and mixed media ground Sunday's excitements and worries—shown in extreme, sometimes manic, facial expressions—on soft, solid, comforting backgrounds. (Picture book. 4-6)"
An energetic, frizzy-haired girl claims her quirkiness but wrestles with her family's frequent moves. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

ANNA SUNDAY by Sally M. Keehn
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2001

"Facts about the war are interwoven and the often-fraught-with-peril journey concludes in a satisfying manner. (map, author's note, selected bibliography) (Fiction. 10-14)"
Twelve-year-old Anna and her nine-year-old brother Jed set off from their Pennsylvania farm in 1863 to find their soldier father, who has been wounded in the first Battle of Winchester, Virginia. Read full book review >