Search Results: "Nicolas Debon"


BOOK REVIEW

THE STRONGEST MAN IN THE WORLD by Nicolas Debon
BIOGRAPHY
Released: April 1, 2007

"A memorable glimpse into the life of a different sort of athlete. (Graphic nonfiction. 7-9)"
An air of Gallic melancholy tinges this graphic-style, fictionalized memoir. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THING-THING by Cary Fagan
CHILDREN'S
Released: Aug. 12, 2008

Staying on the sixth floor of the Excelsior Hotel, Archibald Crump is unhappy with all the hundreds of presents he's gotten for his birthday. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

TIMMERMAN WAS HERE by Colleen Sydor
CHILDREN'S
Released: Sept. 8, 2009

"Provocative. (Picture book. 6-8)"
A little girl is forced to contend with a boarder, Timmerman, when he temporarily occupies the bedroom of her Granddad, who has moved to a senior citizens' home. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WARLORD’S FISH by Virginia Walton Pilegard
ADVENTURE
Released: Nov. 1, 2002

"Still, what better way to introduce them to young readers than with an adventure story—plus instructions at the end for a simple modern instrument made with Styrofoam and a paperclip? (Picture book. 6-8)"
The young artist's apprentice of Warlord's Puzzle (2000) and Warlord's Beads (2001) brings a third ancient invention to the world. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

EVERY SINGLE NIGHT by Dominique Demers
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: March 1, 2006

"Unfortunate choices of layouts and an odd color palette distract so much from the story that the unique tale is almost completely obscured. (Picture book. 4-7)"
A glass of milk, pajamas, a toothbrush, a bath—all are part of Simon's bedtime ritual, but it's not until his father comes into the room to begin putting the world to sleep that he can finally rest. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE RED SASH by Jean E. Pendziwol
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2005

"Supplemented by a long note, a glossary and a map, the episode comes off as purposeful, but there's enough drama to rescue it from aridity. (Picture book. 7-9)"
Offering a glimpse into the early years of the Canadian fur trade, this tale of a young Métis's coming-of-age is driven as much by its historical detail as by plot. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

DAWN WATCH by Jean E. Pendziwol
BEDTIME BOOK
Released: Oct. 10, 2004

"Debon, with his chromatic chiaroscuro paintings, has clearly been there too, as he complements this story in perfect trim. (Picture book. 5-9)"
Dawn watch is the last watch on a sailboat when the sky seems darkest, the waves seem biggest, and you wonder why you're out there. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE WARLORD’S PUPPETEERS by Virginia Walton Pilegard
CHILDREN'S
Released: Oct. 1, 2003

"The exotic setting makes this an appealing alternative to Stuart Murphy's MathStart series. (Picture book. 7-9)"
The ingenious young hero of Warlord's Fish (2002) and two earlier exploits again triumphs while taking in a bit of math. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

FLANDERS SKY by Nicolas Freeling
MYSTERY THRILLER
Released: Sept. 1, 1992

"Thought-provoking and well told."
Another reprimand, another transfer, finds Lille police Commissaire Henri Castang (Those in Peril, etc.) reassigned to Brussels, where he will push paper clips around as a minor functionary under Harold Claverhouse, head of Juridical Services. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE MARTIAL ARTS BOOK by Laura Scandiffio
CHILDREN'S
Released: May 1, 2003

"These missing elements reduce this to the status of an acceptable alternative, but not a replacement, for such introductions as Susan Ribner's thoughtful Martial Arts (1978) or David Mitchell's Young Martial Arts Enthusiast (1997). (Nonfiction. 9-11)"
From Lao Tzu to Bruce Lee, Scandiffio traces the history of the major branches of Asian martial arts, making a brave (if futile) effort to distinguish fact from legend. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THOSE IN PERIL by Nicolas Freeling
Released: Jan. 14, 1990

Lille police commissaire Henri Castang (Not as Far as Velma, 1989) is now shunted off to Paris and the quiet recesses of an art-fraud squad, but his life, as ever, remains tumultuous: his Czech wife Vera is almost raped; he has trouble extricating himself from an affair with his shyly attractive supervisor; and famous TV personality/scholar/ and teacher Dampierre, at his daughter Lydia's lycÇe, is fond of fondling his special students. Read full book review >

BOOK REVIEW

THE JAPANESE CHRONICLES by Nicolas Bouvier
NON-FICTION
Released: March 23, 1992

"A superb guide, smoothly translated from the French, to the Japanese landscape and mind, and a delight for lovers of travel and fine writing. (Twelve photographs—most seen.)"
The ``best travel books,'' Bouvier believes, ``...are often written by people involved in commerce....Merchants' strict observations avoid the silly infatuations that will quickly take over the literature once poets start to travel.'' Happily, in this sensitive, acutely observed record of his stays in Japan, the author, a journalist who lives in Switzerland, disproves that statement with some of the most resonant and perceptive travel writing in recent years. Read full book review >